Study says there could be unintended consequences of taking chocolate milk out of schools.

School chocolate milk debate goes on

Removing chocolate milk from school cafeterias has been promoted over the last few years as a way to reduce the sugar kids consume and decried as a sure way to keep kids from getting the nutrients in milk.

Both might be the case, researchers at Cornell University say.

“On average, milk sales drop by 10%, 29% of white milk gets thrown out, and participation in the school lunch program may also decrease,” reported Andrew Hanks, research associate at Cornell’s Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management.

Getting rid of chocolate — or strawberry — milk may reduce...

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People who were bullied when they were 7 and 11 years old continued to suffer the economic, social and mental health effects in middle age, a new study finds.

Victims of bullying live with the consequences for decades, study says

Victims of bullies suffer the psychological consequences all the way until middle age, with higher levels of depression, anxiety and suicide, new research shows.

The immediate ill effects of bullying have been well documented, with experts increasingly seeing it as a form of child abuse. Influential studies from Finland have made the case that people who were bullied as kids continued to suffer as young adults – girls who were bullied grew up to attempt and commit suicide more frequently by the age of 25, for instance, and boys were more likely to develop anxiety disorders.

Now a trio of...

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A bid to unlock the secrets of resilience in the brain prompted researchers to look for cells that overreacted in the face of stress. What they found was surprising: More overreaction in these cells, not less, seemed to make mice hardier in the face of adversity.

To quash depression, some brain cells must push through the stress

The nature of psychological resilience has, in recent years, been a subject of enormous interest to researchers, who have wondered how some people endure and even thrive under a certain amount of stress, and others crumble and fall prey to depression. The resulting research has underscored the importance of feeling socially connected and the value of psychotherapy to identify and exercise patterns of thought that protect against hopelessness and defeat.

But what does psychological resilience look like inside our brains, at the cellular level? Such knowledge might help bolster peoples' immunity...

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European scientists explored the differing gene expression of identical twin fetuses with a rare distinction: One was genetically normal and the other had trisomy 21 -- the third copy of chromosome 21 that produces Down syndrome.

Identical twins, one case of Down syndrome: a genetic mystery

A rare occurrence in the earliest days of a pregnancy produces an unusual and mystifying outcome: Identical twin fetuses are conceived of the same meeting of egg and sperm. And despite their shared DNA, one of the twins has Down syndrome (the most common genetic cause of intellectual impairment), but the other does not.

For those who labor to understand how 3 billion base pairs of DNA result in the complexity of a single human, it's difficult to discern what effect an extra chromosome has on gene expression across the genome: from individual to individual, there's just too much natural...

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Doctors who gave patients free samples of acne drugs also wound up writing prescriptions for more expensive medications, a new study finds.

Free samples of prescription drugs are costly to patients, study says

Free samples of prescription drugs may seem like a great deal for patients. But even when doctors think they’re doing patients a favor by handing out the freebies, the real beneficiaries are the drug manufacturers, according to new research in the journal JAMA Dermatology.

Medical groups have grown increasingly wary about free drug samples, and they've already been banned by Kaiser Permanente, many academic medical centers, the Veterans Health Administration, the U.S. military and plenty of private medical clinics. Critics of the practice say it encourages doctors to prescribe drugs that...

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Lunar eclipse: Which in 'blood moon' tetrad will put on the best show?

Lunar eclipse: Which in 'blood moon' tetrad will put on the best show?

The first of four consecutive total lunar eclipses -- that riveting "blood moon" -- has occurred. The tetrad has begun! 

Depending on whether you ask a mystic or a scientist, it may or may not be a sign of the apocalypse. But it could be comforting to note that there are eight sets of tetrads in the 21st century.

MORE: What is a blood moon?

There have been periods without tetrads of total lunar eclipses, but NASA's eclipse guru Fred Espenak calls the phenomenon a relatively "frequent  occurrence," at least in the current pattern of eclipses. 

But which of the upcoming eclipses will provide the...

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Brain scans, particularly PET scans, which show metabolic activity in the brain, may be a reliable predictor of an apparently vegetative patient's prospects for recovery, says a new study.

For vegetative patients, a brain scan may detect hope of recovery

In the netherworld that lies between death and full consciousness, some grievously injured or ill patients will remain suspended indefinitely. But others, given time, will eke their way out of the twilight and toward recovery. Accurately predicting which group an apparently vegetative patient falls into could bring comfort, solace and sometimes hope to their families--and also to the patients involved, who may wish to convey they are still "in there," or may feel pain that is not being addressed.

Developing a test that could foretell the long-term outcome of a stricken patient has proved...

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There's an association between women with higher BMIs and fetal and infant death, scientists say.

Increases in women's BMI linked to fetal, infant deaths, study says

As a woman’s body mass index rises before she is pregnant or early in pregnancy, there is an increased risk of fetal death, stillbirth or infant death, and severely obese women have the highest risk, researchers said Tuesday.

But even “modest” increases in BMI were associated with increased risks, the scientists wrote in the Journal of the American Medical Assn.

The scientists recommend that women and their caregivers take the findings into account as they consider getting pregnant. They note that the optimal BMI – calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in...

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Stunning photos recall the magic of Comet ISON's journey

Stunning photos recall the magic of Comet ISON's journey

It's been five months since Comet ISON disintegrated after its close encounter with the sun, but skywatchers on Earth are still savoring its captivating journey.

The comet's million-year journey from the Oort cloud to the center of the solar system ended on Thanksgiving Day 2013, when it came within 730,000 miles of the sun. The flyby pulled apart and melted the ice holding ISON's nucleus together, transforming the sturdy comet into a collection of pebbles and dust.

"Tragically, on Nov. 28, 2013, ISON's tenacious ambition outweighed its ability, and our shining green candle in the solar wind...

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U.S. greenhouse gas emissions dropped in 2012, according to an inventory by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

U.S. greenhouse gas emissions dropped 3.4% in 2012

Greenhouse gas emissions in the United States dropped by 3.4% in 2012, federal environmental regulators reported Tuesday.

The decline over the previous year was driven mostly by power plant operators switching from coal to natural gas, improvements in fuel efficiency for transportation and a warmer winter that cut demand for heating, according to an inventory released by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

The analysis shows the nation released the equivalent of 6,526 million metric tons of carbon dioxide in 2012, the lowest level since 1994.

The annual inventory tracks emissions of...

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Astronomers say a bright blob at the edge of Saturn's rings may be evidence that a new moon is forming.

Mystery object in Saturn's ring may be a new baby moon: Peggy

The moons that orbit Saturn may be increasing by one -- an icy, pint-sized object that astronomers have named “Peggy.”

NASA’s Cassini spacecraft has spotted evidence that a mysterious object measuring perhaps half a mile across is disturbing the outer edge of Saturn’s large, bright A ring. The object’s gravity seems to have roughed up the ring’s usually smooth profile.

PHOTOS: Amazing close-ups of moons

As a result, a stretch of the A ring that measures 750 miles long and 6 miles wide is now about 20% brighter than it would typically appear. The fuzzy blob...

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