SportsSports Now

Los Angeles group continues work on 2024 Olympic bid

OlympicsU.S. Olympic CommitteeInternational Olympic CommitteeEric Garcetti

Speaking to reporters after a board of directors meeting in Los Angeles on Tuesday, U.S. Olympic Committee leaders said they are in the process of meeting with fewer than 10 American cities interested in bidding for the 2024 Summer Games.

The informal discussions will help them decide on two or three domestic finalists. Once the field is narrowed, the USOC will then choose a bid representative -- or choose not to bid at all.

"Our goal is to make a decision by the end of the year," said Scott Blackmun, the USOC's chief executive, adding that the current talks have focused on "which cities do we think can put together a bid that is going to be a fantastic bid."

The Southern California Committee for the Olympic Games has been working on details for bringing the Olympics to Los Angeles for a third time. The group has been gathering community support from Mayor Eric Garcetti and others while weighing various scenarios for where events could be held.

Though the city has a substantial sports infrastructure, the Coliseum would require a significant upgrade for any serious bid, and some facilities might have to be constructed from scratch.

Potential sites such as Farmers Field downtown and a Chivas stadium beside the Coliseum might come into play.

When the Games were held here in 1984, International Olympic Committee officials were not thrilled that the athletes' village was split between dorms at USC and UCLA. Los Angeles would also face the challenge of wooing the IOC yet again, a feat that three-time host London managed for the 2012 Games.

Among other U.S. hopefuls, San Diego recently submitted a proposal. Boston, San Francisco, Dallas, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C., are thought to be interested as well.

Rome and Paris could be leading contenders internationally.

During the Sochi Winter Games, there was friction between the Russian and U.S. governments over such issues as gay rights. IOC officials voiced their displeasure about outside issues' infringing on athletics. 

USOC officials said they do not think global politics will hamper an American bid. 

ALSO:

California Chrome wins the 140th Kentucky Derby

Clippers' Chris Paul knows there is no time for injuries

Floyd Mayweather Jr. prevails in close fight with Marcos Maidana

Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times
Comments
Loading