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In L.A. march, Grand Park performs well with huge crowds; Metro and Pershing Square, not so much

In L.A. march, Grand Park performs well with huge crowds; Metro and Pershing Square, not so much

Any big political march is both a test of a city’s spatial limitations and an exercise in seeing and using that city in a new way. This is especially true in Los Angeles, a city still trying to shake off an outdated reputation as a place without a significant pedestrian culture or vibrant public realm.

The Los Angeles edition of Saturday’s women’s march was in that sense another sign of the city’s continuing effort to redefine, or at least recalibrate, its public-ness. The Los Angeles Police Department called it the largest gathering downtown since the giant immigration rights protest of 2006.

What I found most striking as I watched the march descend on Pershing...

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