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Brian Sandoval

One way to live forever? A time capsule, a Nevada historian says

One way to live forever? A time capsule, a Nevada historian says

Dennis McBride's first time capsule was an amateur affair. The year was 1966 and he was just 11, a scrawny kid whose family lived outside Las Vegas in suburban Boulder City. His father, a truck driver at the Nevada Test Site, had dug up a backyard cottonwood tree, and the boy decided to bury something in the chasm as a record of himself, proof that he existed. So he placed a few of his favorite Matchbox cars — a Volkswagen and flatbed truck — beneath an upside-down flower pot and covered his little vault with dirt. For all he knows, it's still there. McBride now heads the Nevada State Museum, a curator and historian for whom time capsules remain relevant and,...

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