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An overdose, a young companion, drug-fueled parties: The secret life of a USC med school dean

Boston Marathon

The real crisis isn't the intelligence we leak, it's what we don't share

The real crisis isn't the intelligence we leak, it's what we don't share

Everyone in the security world is worried about leaking. Last week, for instance, the U.K. government excoriated U.S. officials for leaking sensitive information about the Manchester terrorist attack. Americans, the British say, cannot keep secrets. In the context of domestic terrorism, however, the real crisis isn’t what we leak — it’s what we don’t share. More than 15 years after the Sept. 11 attacks, federal agencies are somewhat more willing to share information with one another, but they still hold back when it comes to local law enforcement.

To cite one example: In 2015, federal officials chose not to warn police in Garland, Texas, that known terrorism suspects were in the...

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