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Television

Toys R Us puts ‘Breaking Bad’ toys on ‘indefinite sabbatical’ after outcry

‘Breaking Bad’ toys
Bryan Cranston, left, plays Walter White and Aaron Paul plays Jesse Pinkman in a scene from “Breaking Bad.” Toys R Us pulled show-themed toys after a public outcry.
(Frank Ockenfels 3 / AMC)

Toys R Us announced Tuesday that it will pull “Breaking Bad” toys from all its shelves after more than 8,500 people signed an online petition started by an outraged Florida mother.

Susan Schrivjer of Fort Myers posted a petition on Change.org last week after she discovered the popular toy chain carried figures from the critically acclaimed AMC series about a cancer-stricken chemistry-teacher-turned-drug-lord working with his former student.

“It’s One Small step!!!! Let’s keep this up so Toys R Us stores all over will make this right decision!!!!," Schrivjer said on the petition after it was announced the toys would be pulled. 

In its official statement about the removal, Toys R Us directly quoted from a memorable line in the show:

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“Let’s just say, the action figures have taken an ‘indefinite sabbatical’,” according to a Toys R Us statement. The company said it had no further comment.

Schrivjer said the adult, dark themes of the show, along with the perceived drug paraphernalia that comes with the toys, is inappropriate for a children’s toy store. Toys R Us had previously said the toys were kept in an area for older children, and clearly labeled for those 15 and older.

Show star Bryan Cranston even commented on the matter via Twitter.

“‘Florida mom petitions against Toys ‘R Us over Breaking Bad action figures.’ I’m so mad, I’m burning my Florida Mom action figure in protest,” Cranston tweeted.

Attempts to reach Schrivjer for comment were unsuccessful. 

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Follow Ryan Parker for breaking news at @theryanparker on Twitter and on Facebook


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