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  • Time Warner CEO Jeff Bewkes' compensation topped $31 million last year

    Time Warner CEO Jeff Bewkes' compensation topped $31 million last year

    Jeff Bewkes, Time Warner Inc.'s chairman and chief executive, collected a compensation package valued at $31.5 million in 2015, representing a 4% decline from the previous year. Bewkes, 63, received $2 million in salary, $7.9 million in stock options, stock options valued at $8 million and a $13.4-million...

  • U.S. economy grows at slowest pace in two years

    U.S. economy grows at slowest pace in two years

    Growth by the U.S. economy fell off sharply in the first three months of 2016, posting its worst quarterly performance in two years amid a global slowdown, the Commerce Department said Thursday. The broadest measure of the nation's economic output, known as gross domestic product, increased at...

  • California adds 4,200 jobs, while unemployment drops to 5.4%, the lowest in 9 years

    California adds 4,200 jobs, while unemployment drops to 5.4%, the lowest in 9 years

    California added 4,200 jobs in March, the Employment Development Department reported Friday. The uptick pushed unemployment in the state to 5.4%, down from 5.5% a month earlier. March marked the state’s lowest unemployment rate since July 2007.  See the most-read stories this hour >> California...

  • Applications for jobless aid drop, matching 1973 level

    Applications for jobless aid drop, matching 1973 level

    The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits plunged last week, matching a March figure that was the lowest level since 1973. Weekly applications for jobless benefits fell 13,000 to a seasonally adjusted 253,000, the Labor Department said Thursday. The four-week average, a less-volatile...

  • What's next for Orange County Register buyer Digital First?

    What's next for Orange County Register buyer Digital First?

    After Freedom Communications filed for bankruptcy last year, the question was who would buy its newspapers, the Orange County Register and Riverside Press-Enterprise. Now that they have been sold to Digital First Media, another question looms: Who will buy Digital First? The Denver publishing company,...

  • American Apparel lays off hundreds of workers and considers outsourcing some manufacturing

    American Apparel lays off hundreds of workers and considers outsourcing some manufacturing

    American Apparel is laying off hundreds of workers and retooling its production process — and may start making some of its clothing outside Los Angeles.The downtown L.A. company began layoffs last week. So far, about 500 local employees have lost their jobs, said Nativo Lopez, a senior advisor...

  • California Inc.: Organic food with change to spare

    Welcome to California Inc., the weekly newsletter of the Los Angeles Times Business section. I'm Business columnist David Lazarus, and here's a rundown of upcoming stories this week and the highlights of last week. Keep an eye on the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. They'll be meeting...

  • Comcast compensation: Michael Cavanagh is highest paid CFO in the nation

    Comcast compensation: Michael Cavanagh is highest paid CFO in the nation

    At Comcast Corp., there's old money — and new money. The company's longtime chairman and chief executive, Brian Roberts, collected $36.2 million in compensation in 2015, a nearly 10% increase over the previous year, according to a regulatory filing Friday. Roberts is the 56-year-old son of the...

  • Five things to know about the new rules for retirement advisors

    Five things to know about the new rules for retirement advisors

    You might think the people you hired to help arrange your retirement finances have to put your best interests first.  That’s not always the case. So the Obama administration has taken a controversial step to try to protect more Americans from being ripped off. The new rules unveiled Wednesday by...

  • What life is like on $7.25 per hour

    What life is like on $7.25 per hour

    Early Sunday morning, Jewel Walker gets home from her full-time job as a wheelchair assistant at this city’s airport and sets her alarm clock for 6 a.m. It is still dark when she wakes, and the exhausted 19-year-old does not stop for breakfast. To make her 8 a.m. shift at her second job as a Burger...

  • California's economy expected to outpace that of U.S. this year

    California's economy expected to outpace that of U.S. this year

    California's economy will grow faster this year than the national economy, and unemployment will drop to 5% in early 2017, according to a new report by the UCLA Anderson Forecast. Personal income in California will increase more slowly than it has in recent years, when the state's economy was bouncing...

  • Ford to build factory in Mexico, moving small-car production from U.S.

    Ford to build factory in Mexico, moving small-car production from U.S.

    Ford Motor Co. plans to build a $1.6-billion auto assembly plant in Mexico, creating about 2,800 jobs there and shifting small-car production away from the United States at a time when moving jobs south of the border has become a major issue in the U.S. presidential campaign. The company announced...

  • On a big day for minimum-wage laws, Hillary Clinton, not Bernie Sanders, grabs the spotlight

    On a big day for minimum-wage laws, Hillary Clinton, not Bernie Sanders, grabs the spotlight

    With the stroke of a pen, Andrew Cuomo got a beat on Jerry Brown. And with the flash of the cameras shortly after, Hillary Clinton sought to steal a bit of Bernie Sanders' spotlight. Cuomo, New York's governor, signed into law the first statewide $15-an-hour minimum wage in the nation Monday, beating...

  • How to recognize and deal with bullying at work

    Bullies, bullies and more bullies — I can't get away from writing about this topic. According to the Workplace Bullying Institute, bullying at work means "repeated, health-harming mistreatment of a person by one or more perpetrators. It is abusive conduct that is: threatening, humiliating, or intimidating,...

  • A guide to drawing down your savings in retirement

    A guide to drawing down your savings in retirement

    The approach of retirement should be an exciting time for 50- and 60-somethings. But when the issue is your finances — and whether you've saved enough to last the rest of your life — excitement can quickly be overridden by anxiety. One of the first decisions retirees must make is how much of their...

  • What it's like to live in a city with a $14 minimum wage

    What it's like to live in a city with a $14 minimum wage

    Security guard Kenneth Lofton was among the workers who benefited last year when this East Bay city hiked its hourly minimum wage to nearly $15 for employees at large companies. The jump was almost 50% more than what he used to make in nearby Oakland when he was paid $10 an hour. But it's not enough...

  • Fed holds key interest rate steady, signals just two hikes this year

    Fed holds key interest rate steady, signals just two hikes this year

    Federal Reserve policymakers on Wednesday held a key interest rate steady and signaled there would be no more than two small hikes this year — half what they had earlier estimated — amid lower economic growth forecasts. Despite global turmoil in recent weeks, the U.S. economy has been "expanding...

  • How the refineries came to own our air pollution regulators

    How the refineries came to own our air pollution regulators

    "Regulatory capture" is the term for what happens when an agency overseeing an industry begins to see things the industry's way. Consider the most recent illustration: the South Coast Air Quality Management District board and the refinery industry. The refineries are among the worst-polluting facilities...

  • California bill would let gig workers organize for collective bargaining

    California bill would let gig workers organize for collective bargaining

    Gig workers such as Uber and Lyft drivers would gain the right to collectively bargain for benefits and wages under legislation introduced in California on Wednesday. The bill, by Assemblywoman Lorena S. Gonzalez (D-San Diego), seeks to amend state labor law and allow groups of 10 or more independent...

  • Two months after a heart transplant, airline wants him back at work -- or else

    Two months after a heart transplant, airline wants him back at work -- or else

    If you had to undergo a heart transplant, chances are you'd be in no hurry to get back to work — if a return was even possible. Now consider the situation of Oscar Munoz, chief executive of United Airlines. The carrier proudly announced this week that he'll be back on the job Monday, just two months...

  • Can a sinking stock market cause a recession?

    Can a sinking stock market cause a recession?

    When the stock market got off to a lousy start this year, some analysts fretted that the market's woes might even contribute to a U.S. economic recession in the coming months. Such thinking generally goes against conventional wisdom, which holds that stock market trends are mainly just predictive...

  • Janitors and security guards are paid 20% less when they're contractors, report says

    Janitors and security guards are paid 20% less when they're contractors, report says

    A boom in companies trying to cut costs by contracting out janitorial and security jobs has led to large pay disparities between workers doing the same jobs, according to a UC Berkeley report.Janitors who work for California contractors earn on average $10.31 an hour, or 20% less than janitors...

  • California Inc.: What would a Trump presidency mean for the markets?

    Welcome to California Inc., the weekly newsletter of the L.A. Times Business Section. I'm Business columnist David Lazarus, and here's a rundown of upcoming stories this week and the highlights of last week. Stocks gained ground Friday after the Labor Department said the economy added a surprisingly...

  • U.S. payrolls show surprising growth in February; unemployment holds steady

    U.S. payrolls show surprising growth in February; unemployment holds steady

    A surprisingly strong gain of 242,000 net new jobs last month helped ease fears that the U.S. was skidding toward a recession, but a disappointing drop in average wages showed that the labor market is still a ways from fully healed.The report released Friday by the Labor Department probably wasn't...

  • Stocks close higher, extending winning streak to 4 days

    Stocks close higher, extending winning streak to 4 days

    Stocks wobbled to the finish Friday but salvaged a four-day winning streak after the U.S. government said employers added more jobs than expected in February. That was another vote of confidence in the economy. Mining companies made the biggest gains, as metals prices climbed. The jobs report showed...

  • Five takeaways from February's surprising jobs report

    Five takeaways from February's surprising jobs report

    The labor market showed surprising strength last month in the face of slowing global growth, adding a robust 242,000 net new jobs after disappointing gains in January added to fears the U.S. economic recovery was losing momentum. The mostly upbeat Labor Department report released Friday helped...

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