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  • Why Obama's overtime rule may barely dent the economy

    Why Obama's overtime rule may barely dent the economy

    President Obama’s new overtime rule has been trashed as a job killer by conservatives and heralded as a salve for the middle class by liberals. In reality, the measure probably won’t have much of an economic effect, partly because employers will find legal ways of getting around it. The new rule...

  • California Inc.: A big ship celebrates a big milestone

    Welcome to California Inc., the weekly newsletter of the L.A. Times Business Section. I'm Business columnist David Lazarus, and here's a rundown of upcoming stories this week and the highlights of last week. Good news for California: The Golden State added 59,600 jobs in April. Unemployment, which...

  • China stimulus propels U.S. stocks' biggest gain since March

    China stimulus propels U.S. stocks' biggest gain since March

    U.S. stocks surged to their biggest gain in two months Tuesday after the Chinese government moved to stimulate the world's second-largest economy. That gave a big boost to energy, chemicals and machinery companies.  Investors have worried for months about the state of China's economy, which is...

  • Stock market rises on hopes that Fed might keep interest rates low

    Stock market rises on hopes that Fed might keep interest rates low

    Stocks closed modestly higher Friday, ending three days of losses, after the U.S. government's disappointing jobs report added to speculation that the Federal Reserve might keep interest rates low for another year. Investors were also weighing tepid U.S. earnings reports and persistent weakness...

  • U.S. job growth disappoints at 160,000 in April, adding to concerns about the economy

    U.S. job growth disappoints at 160,000 in April, adding to concerns about the economy

    Job growth slowed sharply in April to a seven-month low, adding to concerns about the health of the U.S. economy after a weak start to the year. The nation’s public- and private-sector employers added 160,000 net new jobs last month, the Labor Department said Friday. The figure was below analysts’...

  • Stocks close mostly flat as investors await jobs report

    Stocks close mostly flat as investors await jobs report

    Stocks closed mostly unchanged Thursday, as an earlier rally in oil prices faded and investors waited for the release of a closely watched jobs report. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 9.45 points, or less than 0.1%, to 17,660.71. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell 0.49 of a point, less...

  • Weak U.S. hiring report sends stocks lower

    Weak U.S. hiring report sends stocks lower

    U.S. and global stock indexes moved lower for a second day Wednesday following a dismal report on job creation that gave investors concern over the state of the economy. That data followed a round of economic news out of China and Europe on Tuesday that also suggested sluggish growth. The Dow Jones...

  • Private-sector job growth stumbles to slowest pace in three years, ADP says

    Private-sector job growth stumbles to slowest pace in three years, ADP says

    Private-sector job growth unexpectedly stumbled last month, with U.S. companies hiring workers at the slowest pace in three years, payroll firm Automatic Data Processing said Wednesday. Employers added 156,000 net new jobs in April, a sharp fall-off from a downwardly revised 194,000 the previous...

  • Uber sued again over drivers' employment status

    Uber sued again over drivers' employment status

    The class action flood gates have opened. Less than two weeks after Uber Technologies agreed to pay up to $100 million to settle class-action lawsuits in California and Massachusetts in which drivers sought to be reclassified as employees instead of independent contractors, the ride-hailing company...

  • In a down-on-its-luck Oregon mill town, the savior they're waiting for is Donald Trump

    In a down-on-its-luck Oregon mill town, the savior they're waiting for is Donald Trump

    He used to wake her up nights, shouting out his terror in the dark, his tattooed biceps continuing their clench-and-spasm dance long after a shift feeding cedar logs into the endless maw of the lumber mill. In his nightmare, Keven Jones pushed the logs into neat rows, but as he dreamed, the logs...

  • Rising confidence in California's economy is a challenge for GOP presidential candidates

    Rising confidence in California's economy is a challenge for GOP presidential candidates

    The Republican candidates for president have campaigned all over the country lamenting the rough recovery from the recession and condemning President Obama — and by extension Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton — as failures when it comes to jobs and the nation's well-being. Then they come...

  • California Inc.: At last, a place young ninjas can call home

    Welcome to California Inc., the weekly newsletter of the L.A. Times Business Section. I'm Business columnist David Lazarus, and here's a rundown of upcoming stories this week and the highlights of last week. Wall Street is still digesting word from the Commerce Department that U.S. economic growth...

  • Time Warner CEO Jeff Bewkes' compensation topped $31 million last year

    Time Warner CEO Jeff Bewkes' compensation topped $31 million last year

    Jeff Bewkes, Time Warner Inc.'s chairman and chief executive, collected a compensation package valued at $31.5 million in 2015, representing a 4% decline from the previous year. Bewkes, 63, received $2 million in salary, $7.9 million in stock options, stock options valued at $8 million and a $13.4-million...

  • U.S. economy grows at slowest pace in two years

    U.S. economy grows at slowest pace in two years

    Growth by the U.S. economy fell off sharply in the first three months of 2016, posting its worst quarterly performance in two years amid a global slowdown, the Commerce Department said Thursday. The broadest measure of the nation's economic output, known as gross domestic product, increased at...

  • Four consequences of a $15 minimum wage

    Four consequences of a $15 minimum wage

    Exhaustive research over the past few decades suggests raising the minimum wage has little negative impact on overall employment. Problem is, most past wage hikes have been relatively modest, and there's no data to confidently predict what might happen following the kinds of increases now planned...

  • California Inc.: Do state lawmakers deserve a raise?

    Welcome to California Inc., the weekly newsletter of the L.A. Times Business section. I’m Business columnist David Lazarus, and here’s a rundown of upcoming stories this week and the highlights of last week. The death of Prince last week produced copious coverage. We weighed in with a story about...

  • Why 'rankism' harms the workplace and how to address it

    Why 'rankism' harms the workplace and how to address it

    Have you ever witnessed people who "pull rank" on another person who is lower in the organization's hierarchy? They make abusive or manipulative comments, act disrespectfully to others or take advantage of them. They abuse their power or perceived power. The term "rankism" was used by Robert W....

  • Applications for unemployment benefits fall to four-decade low

    Applications for unemployment benefits fall to four-decade low

    The number of Americans seeking jobless aid fell to a four-decade low last week, a sign that employers are unconcerned about weak economic growth in the first three months of 2016. Weekly applications for jobless benefits declined to a seasonally adjusted 247,000, the lowest reading since November...

  • Intel to slash 12,000 jobs as it moves away from PCs

    Intel to slash 12,000 jobs as it moves away from PCs

    Giant chipmaker Intel Corp. will slash 12,000 jobs, or about 11% of its workforce, to help offset declining PC sales and reposition itself as a firm focused on cloud computing and smart devices, the company said Tuesday. “We are evolving from a PC company to one that powers the cloud and billions...

  • CBS Chief Executive Leslie Moonves was paid $56.8 million in 2015

    CBS Chief Executive Leslie Moonves was paid $56.8 million in 2015

    CBS Corp. Chief Executive Leslie Moonves’ compensation reached $56.8 million in 2015, securing his standing as one of America's highest-paid executives.His total compensation declined slightly from 2014, when it totaled $57.2 million, according to a Securities and Exchange Commission filing on...

  • California adds 4,200 jobs, while unemployment drops to 5.4%, the lowest in 9 years

    California adds 4,200 jobs, while unemployment drops to 5.4%, the lowest in 9 years

    California added 4,200 jobs in March, the Employment Development Department reported Friday. The uptick pushed unemployment in the state to 5.4%, down from 5.5% a month earlier. March marked the state’s lowest unemployment rate since July 2007.  See the most-read stories this hour >> California...

  • Applications for jobless aid drop, matching 1973 level

    Applications for jobless aid drop, matching 1973 level

    The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits plunged last week, matching a March figure that was the lowest level since 1973. Weekly applications for jobless benefits fell 13,000 to a seasonally adjusted 253,000, the Labor Department said Thursday. The four-week average, a less-volatile...

  • What's next for Orange County Register buyer Digital First?

    What's next for Orange County Register buyer Digital First?

    After Freedom Communications filed for bankruptcy last year, the question was who would buy its newspapers, the Orange County Register and Riverside Press-Enterprise. Now that they have been sold to Digital First Media, another question looms: Who will buy Digital First? The Denver publishing company,...

  • American Apparel lays off hundreds of workers and considers outsourcing some manufacturing

    American Apparel lays off hundreds of workers and considers outsourcing some manufacturing

    American Apparel is laying off hundreds of workers and retooling its production process — and may start making some of its clothing outside Los Angeles.The downtown L.A. company began layoffs last week. So far, about 500 local employees have lost their jobs, said Nativo Lopez, a senior advisor...

  • California Inc.: Organic food with change to spare

    Welcome to California Inc., the weekly newsletter of the Los Angeles Times Business section. I'm Business columnist David Lazarus, and here's a rundown of upcoming stories this week and the highlights of last week. Keep an eye on the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. They'll be meeting...

  • Comcast compensation: Michael Cavanagh is highest paid CFO in the nation

    Comcast compensation: Michael Cavanagh is highest paid CFO in the nation

    At Comcast Corp., there's old money — and new money. The company's longtime chairman and chief executive, Brian Roberts, collected $36.2 million in compensation in 2015, a nearly 10% increase over the previous year, according to a regulatory filing Friday. Roberts is the 56-year-old son of the...

  • Five things to know about the new rules for retirement advisors

    Five things to know about the new rules for retirement advisors

    You might think the people you hired to help arrange your retirement finances have to put your best interests first.  That’s not always the case. So the Obama administration has taken a controversial step to try to protect more Americans from being ripped off. The new rules unveiled Wednesday by...

  • What life is like on $7.25 per hour

    What life is like on $7.25 per hour

    Early Sunday morning, Jewel Walker gets home from her full-time job as a wheelchair assistant at this city’s airport and sets her alarm clock for 6 a.m. It is still dark when she wakes, and the exhausted 19-year-old does not stop for breakfast. To make her 8 a.m. shift at her second job as a Burger...

  • California's economy expected to outpace that of U.S. this year

    California's economy expected to outpace that of U.S. this year

    California's economy will grow faster this year than the national economy, and unemployment will drop to 5% in early 2017, according to a new report by the UCLA Anderson Forecast. Personal income in California will increase more slowly than it has in recent years, when the state's economy was bouncing...

  • Ford to build factory in Mexico, moving small-car production from U.S.

    Ford to build factory in Mexico, moving small-car production from U.S.

    Ford Motor Co. plans to build a $1.6-billion auto assembly plant in Mexico, creating about 2,800 jobs there and shifting small-car production away from the United States at a time when moving jobs south of the border has become a major issue in the U.S. presidential campaign. The company announced...

  • On a big day for minimum-wage laws, Hillary Clinton, not Bernie Sanders, grabs the spotlight

    On a big day for minimum-wage laws, Hillary Clinton, not Bernie Sanders, grabs the spotlight

    With the stroke of a pen, Andrew Cuomo got a beat on Jerry Brown. And with the flash of the cameras shortly after, Hillary Clinton sought to steal a bit of Bernie Sanders' spotlight. Cuomo, New York's governor, signed into law the first statewide $15-an-hour minimum wage in the nation Monday, beating...

  • How to recognize and deal with bullying at work

    Bullies, bullies and more bullies — I can't get away from writing about this topic. According to the Workplace Bullying Institute, bullying at work means "repeated, health-harming mistreatment of a person by one or more perpetrators. It is abusive conduct that is: threatening, humiliating, or intimidating,...

  • A guide to drawing down your savings in retirement

    A guide to drawing down your savings in retirement

    The approach of retirement should be an exciting time for 50- and 60-somethings. But when the issue is your finances — and whether you've saved enough to last the rest of your life — excitement can quickly be overridden by anxiety. One of the first decisions retirees must make is how much of their...

  • What it's like to live in a city with a $14 minimum wage

    What it's like to live in a city with a $14 minimum wage

    Security guard Kenneth Lofton was among the workers who benefited last year when this East Bay city hiked its hourly minimum wage to nearly $15 for employees at large companies. The jump was almost 50% more than what he used to make in nearby Oakland when he was paid $10 an hour. But it's not enough...

  • Laid-off Americans are finally returning to the labor market: Will they find jobs?

    Laid-off Americans are finally returning to the labor market: Will they find jobs?

    After years of sitting on the sidelines, hundreds of thousands of workers who lost their jobs in the 2007-08 financial crash are finally getting back into the game. Friday's jobs report shows that since September, droves of laid-off Americans who had been conspicuously absent from the recovery...

  • Why American workers aren't changing jobs, and what it means for the economy

    Why American workers aren't changing jobs, and what it means for the economy

    Despite steady job growth and a low unemployment rate, the U.S.  recovery is trailing in one key aspect: the kind of labor market dynamism that played a large role in making the country the world’s economic superpower. One telltale sign is that workers are changing jobs at a slower pace than before....

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