Money Talk

Personal Finance Q&A: How credit card fraud can mess up auto-payments

Money Talk
Keep a list of bills on auto-pay so you don't forget to update them when a card expires or its number changes

Dear Liz: We've had three cases of credit card fraud. Each time, the credit card company issued new cards with new numbers and canceled the old ones (along with the fraudulent charges). We had nine monthly auto-payment authorizations set up, and we seethed at the fact that the card company would not offer to authorize our auto-payments via the new numbers. We eventually received late-payment notices and charges, since the old numbers were still on the record with payees. Are there companies that offer updates to payees when cards are canceled, and new ones issued, in such fraud situations?

Answer: Given all the database breaches lately, automatic updates to auto-payments might come in handy.

But it seems you're on your own. Your agreements with your billers typically state that you're required to update them whenever a card expires or its number changes. Many billers will alert you when an expiration date is near or if a charge doesn't go through, but ultimately it's your responsibility to keep track.

It's a good idea to keep a list of your auto-payments so you don't forget to update them all when this happens again. If you don't have a list, simply checking your past statements should remind you which accounts are on auto-pay.

VA coverage meets Obamacare requirements

Dear Liz: My brother is a Vietnam veteran. Every month since his separation from the Navy in 1969, he has had a monthly premium deducted from his pay and sent to the Veterans Administration for his medical insurance coverage. Last month he received a notice from his employer stating that if he doesn't sign up and pay premiums under the Affordable Care Act, he will be fined for not having medical insurance. How can this be? He goes to the VA for all of his medical needs. Can this truly be correct?

Answer: People enrolled in VA healthcare don't have to sign up for additional health insurance or pay additional premiums. Their VA coverage meets the Affordable Care Act's requirements for coverage.

Your brother's employer may have sent out a general notice to all employees about the law, rather than one that reflects his individual situation. If the employer believes that VA coverage doesn't qualify, it should be alerted to this page on the VA site: http://www.va.gov/health/aca/.

Social Security's windfall elimination provision

Dear Liz: As a faculty member who was only recently allowed to participate in our state's public employees' retirement system, I will have a very small pension. I'm told that Social Security will then reduce my benefit by up to 50% as a result of the so-called windfall elimination provision. Can you tell me how this is legal?

Answer: Many people affected by Social Security's windfall elimination provision are outraged that their benefits will be reduced. Before the provision was enacted in 1983, though, people who paid less into the Social Security system wound up getting an outsized benefit.

Here's why. Social Security is designed to replace more of a worker's income the less he or she makes, with the understanding that saving for retirement is harder the lower your income.

When you get a pension from an employer who doesn't pay into the Social Security system, but you also qualify for Social Security benefits from other jobs, your Social Security earnings record can look as if you were a long-term, low-wage worker even when you're not. Without the windfall elimination provision, you could wind up with a Social Security check that replaces more of your income than you would have received had you only worked in jobs covered by Social Security.

How much your benefit will be reduced depends in part on how many years you worked in those other jobs — the ones that were covered by Social Security. The longer you worked at jobs covered by Social Security, the less the windfall elimination provision affects you, as long as you had "substantial earnings" from those jobs. The amount that's considered substantial varies by year, ranging from $3,300 in 1974 to $21,750 this year. You'll experience the maximum 50% reduction if you have 20 or fewer years of substantial earnings. If you have 30 years of such earnings, the provision doesn't affect you at all.

Questions may be sent to Liz Weston, 3940 Laurel Canyon, No. 238, Studio City, CA 91604, or by using the "Contact" form at asklizweston.com. Distributed by No More Red Inc.

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