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Morning Fix

ABC unveils fall schedule. Cannes Film Festival gets rolling.

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Morning Fix: ABC unveils new schedule. Cannes Film Festival gets underway.
Morning Fix: ABC has lots of drama. Net neutrality debate heats up.
Morning Fix: Diversity is theme at ABC. Oscar winner Malik Bendjelloul dies.

After the coffee. Before the CBS and Turner upfronts.

The Skinny: Got to Yankee Stadium last night but unfortunately the Bronx Bombers decided not to show up. The Mets crushed them. Still, the seats were amazing. Today's roundup includes analysis on ABC's new fall schedule and previews of the Cannes Film Festival.

Daily Dose: At ESPN's upfront presentation to advertisers Tuesday, Chief Executive John Skipper said he hopes the Disney unit's new SEC Channel will have wide distribution by its August launch. But negotiations may be tough with some operators. Last month, a Comcast system in Georgia launched a campaign against the network and created a bogus website that claimed to have been set up by SEC fans and alumni. Comcast's corporate office has since put out a statement disavowing its local operator's smear efforts. "This campaign was not authorized to be implemented and does not reflect the current state of our negotiations. We apologize for any confusion," a Comcast spokesman said.

Call it the Shonda network. ABC unveiled its fall schedule to advertisers with the highlight being "How to Get Away With Murder," a new drama from producer Shonda Rhimes ("Grey's Anatomy," "Scandal.") The network also finally decided to put a family sitcom behind its No. 1 sitcom "Modern Family," which for years has had shows about anything but family as a lead-out. The network stressed diversity of casts in all its new programs. "You're going to see shows reflecting the already changed face of America," ABC Entertainment chief Paul Lee told advertisers. More on ABC's lineup from the Los Angeles Times, New York Times, USA Today and Hollywood Reporter.

The big picture. When broadcasters preview their fall schedules to advertisers, they tend to talk only about how they are doing vs. other broadcast networks. But the biggest threat to CBS isn't just what NBC or ABC or Fox are doing. It's what is happening on cable channels, Netflix, Amazon and Hulu. It hasn't been a three-network or even a five-network world in decades and the networks need to figure out how to react to more than just what their closest rivals are doing. TV Guide with a step back on the state of the biz.

Heating up. Univision and Telemundo pitched their schedules to advertisers Tuesday. But the race for supremacy among Spanish viewers is no longer just between those two horses. Disney and Fox have their own Latin-themed channels and other networks are trying to capture a piece of the growing Latino  advertising pie. The Los Angeles Times on the Spanish TV landscape.

Get the popcorn ready. While the TV industry hangs out in New York going to upfronts, much of the movie industry will be partying it up at the Cannes Film Festival, which gets underway Wednesday night. The highlight for me, if I were there, would be a beach screening of the Walter Hill classic "The Warriors," one of my all-time favorites. Cannes curtain raisers from the Los Angeles Times, New York Times, Variety and Deadline Hollywood.

No neutrality on this issue. On Thursday, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler is expected to propose new rules for Web traffic expected to include allowing companies to pay broadband providers to ensure their content travels fast. The idea of fast and slow lanes has led to a huge debate at the FCC and across America. Watchdogs and consumer activists are concerned that the Internet will become a world of haves and have-nots. Some think the Internet should be regulated like a phone company, something Wheeler has expressed reluctance to do. A preview from the Wall Street Journal.

Inside the Los Angeles Times: Malik Bendjelloul, who won an Oscar for directing the documentary "Sugar Man," died at age 36 on Tuesday. Smokey Bear is getting a makeover, but the message about forest fires remains the same.

Follow me on Twitter. I am the man who tweets. @JBFlint.

 

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