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SAG-AFTRA and studios extend contract talks

Hollywood's largest union, SAG-AFTRA, and the major studios extend talks over a new film and TV contract

Hollywood's largest union and the major studios are taking more time to finalize a new film and TV contract for actors and other performers.

SAG-AFTRA and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers said late Monday night that they have agreed to a 24-hour extension of the film and TV contracts that were set to expire at midnight June 30. 

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FOR THE RECORD 

July 1, 6:56 a.m.: An earlier version of this post stated that the contracts between SAG-AFTRA and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers were set to expire July 30. The date was June 30.

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Citing "productive negotiations," the sides said they wanted more time to hash out a new three-year film and TV contract for the union's 165,000 members.

Negotiations began May 5 and were expected to wrap in mid-June, following similar deals reached earlier this year by unions representing writers and directors.

However, negotiations have taken longer than anticipated mainly because of complications surrounding creating a single master contract to replace separate agreements that existed before the two former rival unions combined in 2012.

Among the top priorities in the SAG-AFTRA talks is to bring uniformity to TV contracts, which still operate under terms negotiated by the formerly separate unions, according to people involved in the negotiations. Even though they have merged, the unions still have separate health and pension plans.

SAG-AFTRA President Ken Howard is leading the talks, and SAG-AFTRA National Executive Director David White is the union's chief negotiator.

Update: After agreeing to a 24-hour extension in negotiations, SAG-AFTRA and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers were unable to reach an accord late Tuesday night on a new film and TV contract. But the parties announced they would extend talks for a second day.

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