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46 posts
  • Cleveland National Forest fire
  • Holy fire
A DC-10 makes a fire retardant drop over the Holy fire Wednesday.
A DC-10 makes a fire retardant drop over the Holy fire Wednesday. (Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times)

The Holy fire in the Cleveland National Forest marched toward Lake Elsinore on Thursday afternoon, forcing a new round of evacuations.

Residents living in homes on the mountainside of Lake Street and in the southeast region from Grand Avenue to Ortega Highway were told by the U.S. Forest Service to leave their homes immediately as the 9,600-acre fire moved their way.

To the south, the Rangeland fire broke out west of Ramona and quickly charred between 100 and 150 acres while threatening structures along a rural road.

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  • Cleveland National Forest fire
  • Holy fire

The Holy fire grew to 9,600 acres by Thursday morning, threatening homes near Lake Elsinore. 

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Scott Gregory looks for valuables at his home destroyed by the Carr fire in the Landpark Subdivision in Redding.
Scott Gregory looks for valuables at his home destroyed by the Carr fire in the Landpark Subdivision in Redding. (Gary Coronado / Los Angeles Times)

A Cal Fire mechanic assigned to the Carr fire died in a vehicle crash in Tehama County early Thursday morning, the eighth death connected to the furious blaze that has scorched roughly 177,000 acres in Northern California, officials said.

The victim, described as a heavy equipment mechanic, died in a crash on Highway 99, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection said in a statement.

The crash happened at 12:17 a.m. after a Dodge Ram 5500 veered off the highway’s right shoulder, slammed into a tree and caught fire, according to Officer Ken Reineman of the California Highway Patrol’s Red Bluff station. The victim’s identity has not been released.

One key to getting through any emergency situation is preparation.

For Trey Rosenbalm and Ariana Altier, fighting the largest fire in California history takes more than just watching out for flames.

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As the Holy fire raged nearby and forced residents to flee their homes, the man accused of setting the 6,200-acre blaze sat in front of a news camera and said he had no idea how it started.

In an otherwise deserted part of Clearlake Oaks, which was under a mandatory evacuation order, Nicole Young sat on the porch of a triple-wide lakefront mobile home with a couple of other holdouts.

Please spare me all the political patter about California burning being the “new normal.” It’s really getting old.

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The Holy fire in the Cleveland National Forest pushed closer to some homes Wednesday, prompting a new round of mandatory evacuations.

Just two days after President Trump issued an utterly uninformed tweet about the causes of the California wildfires, his ulterior motives began to come into focus.