LOCAL L.A. Now

Rainstorm could be Los Angeles' wettest in 2 years

Get ready, L.A. -- the winter storms headed to Los Angeles this week could be the wettest in two years.

The first storm, expected to hit Wednesday evening, could bring as much as a quarter of an inch of rain to Los Angeles County and leave by Thursday morning. A stronger second storm will arrive in time for the Friday afternoon commute and power through Saturday, dousing the coast and valleys with 1 to 2 inches of rain and as much as 4 inches in the mountains.

“It’s been … years” since this much rain has come to Los Angeles, said National Weather Service meteorologist Scott Sukup. The last time this much rain has come to Los Angeles was on March 25, 2012, when 0.91 inches of precipitation fell in downtown.

How long ago was that? That was the same weekend the first "Hunger Games" movie came out. Mitt Romney still had not clinched the Republican nomination for president. The latest iPhone on the market was the iPhone 4S.

The storm systems will sweep in from the north and douse most of the state. For the mountains, snow and strong wind is forecast Friday into Saturday, and snow levels could drop to 5,000 feet by Saturday.

The winter storm will sweep away the 70-degree temperatures the region has enjoyed, with temps dropping to the low to mid 60s. Overnight lows could dip into the upper 40s. For the Academy Awards on March 2, forecasters say there is a 40% chance of showers, with highs in the 60s.

Forecasters warned that the second storm could produce flooding and powerful flows of mud and debris cascading from fire-scarred hillsides.

And how little rain have we received? Just 1.2 inches since July 1. The average is 10.45 inches by this time of year.

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ron.lin@latimes.com

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