ENVIRONMENT

LATEST ENVIRONMENT NEWS

  • Nearly 50 million children uprooted: A global crisis by the numbers

    Nearly 50 million children uprooted: A global crisis by the numbers

    The haunting images of Syrian toddler Aylan Kurdi’s body washed up on a Turkish beach, and of Omran Daqneesh’s bloodied and bewildered face after his home was destroyed in Aleppo, have become emblems of the heavy toll inflicted by war and displacement on the world’s children. But the sheer magnitude...

  • California's water conservation dips in July — are eased rules to blame?

    California's water conservation dips in July — are eased rules to blame?

    Urban water conservation across California dipped slightly during the second month that less stringent conservation requirements have been in place, state regulators said Wednesday. More alarming to some, the 20% water-use reduction in July, compared with the same month in 2013, also marked a sharp...

  • U.S. clears way for cleanup of Colorado mine after huge spill

    U.S. clears way for cleanup of Colorado mine after huge spill

    A Colorado mine that spilled 3 million gallons of contaminated wastewater into rivers in three Western states has been designated a Superfund site.  The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's action Wednesday clears the way for a multimillion-dollar federal cleanup of the Gold King Mine and 47...

  • Despite desalinating water, floating it in by barge and taking short showers, Catalina islanders are told to cut back even more

    Despite desalinating water, floating it in by barge and taking short showers, Catalina islanders are told to cut back even more

    This quaint resort town has a reputation for making visitors feel as if they’re an ocean apart from the troubled megalopolis 22 miles to the east. So it figures that the tourists in Hawaiian shirts and flip-flops strolling past Avalon’s restaurants, bars and trinket shops seemed unruffled by the...

  • The forecast for Lake Mead: Hot and dry with plenty of anxiety

    The forecast for Lake Mead: Hot and dry with plenty of anxiety

    A reckoning arrives every August for the Colorado River and the 40 million people across the West who depend on it. After water managers measure annual inflows and outflows and do their best to estimate future precipitation in places as far-flung as northwestern Wyoming and southwestern New Mexico,...

  • This Mojave Desert solar plant kills 6,000 birds a year. Here's why that won't change any time soon

    This Mojave Desert solar plant kills 6,000 birds a year. Here's why that won't change any time soon

    A macabre fireworks show unfolds each day along I-15 west of Las Vegas, as birds fly into concentrated beams of sunlight and are instantly incinerated, leaving wisps of white smoke against the blue desert sky. Workers at the Ivanpah Solar Plant have a name for the spectacle: “Streamers.”  And the...

  • Reward to find killer of sea otters off Central Coast doubles to $20,000

    Reward to find killer of sea otters off Central Coast doubles to $20,000

    The reward to find whoever is responsible for fatally shooting three sea otters off the Central Coast has been doubled to $20,000. On Thursday, the nonprofit Center for Biological Diversity announced it would contribute to the reward announced by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife earlier...

  • Hot? You can cool down by suiting up in this high-tech fabric

    Hot? You can cool down by suiting up in this high-tech fabric

    Just in time for scientists to declare 2016 the hottest year on record, scientists at Stanford University have developed a material that could make the coolest clothes ever — shirts and pants that block the sun’s warming rays while venting body heat more efficiently than cotton or other conventional...

  • Legislature declines to add 'environmental justice' members to Southern California air quality board

    Legislature declines to add 'environmental justice' members to Southern California air quality board

    The state Legislature has rejected a controversial measure that would have shifted the political balance of Southern California’s air-quality board by adding three state-appointed “environmental justice” members to represent low-income communities suffering from pollution.  The legislation to expand...

  • Meet the pangolin, the most poached mammal in the world

    Meet the pangolin, the most poached mammal in the world

    As the congress of the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources gets underway Thursday in Hawaii, environmental policymakers and conservation experts will discuss managing the environment, protecting wildlife and how best to chart the direction of conservation efforts....

  • Take the gnatcatcher off the endangered list? Here's why wildlife officials say no

    Take the gnatcatcher off the endangered list? Here's why wildlife officials say no

    Federal wildlife authorities on Tuesday said that a review of genetic tests has led them to conclude that the coastal California gnatcatcher is a valid subspecies and therefore worthy of protections that have barred development on tens of thousands of acres of prime Southern California real estate...

  • L.A. betting that stormwater can help ease California's drought

    L.A. betting that stormwater can help ease California's drought

    Five years of drought have struck different parts of California unevenly.  Cities with multiple sources of water have weathered the crisis relatively well, even after important reservoirs have hit bottom. But residents of some small towns in the San Joaquin Valley and northern California, who depend...

  • Oil refiners agree to pay $425 million to reduce air pollution in the West

    Oil refiners agree to pay $425 million to reduce air pollution in the West

    Concluding a long legal climb to cleaner air, the federal government Monday announced a record $425-million settlement with two oil refiners that is expected to reduce pollution emissions in the West by almost 43,000 tons annually. The Justice Department and the Environmental Protection Agency...

  • To avoid conflict, L.A. mountain lions choose separate hunting grounds

    To avoid conflict, L.A. mountain lions choose separate hunting grounds

    In the hills and wooded areas of the Los Angeles area, mountain lions remain a constant, yet mostly unseen, presence. But the predators may come closer to human areas to hunt than we previously realized, according to a recent study by UCLA and the National Park Service. The study, published in...

  • Obama administration strengthens Arctic drilling restrictions

    Obama administration strengthens Arctic drilling restrictions

    The Obama administration has made it harder to drill for oil in the Arctic Ocean – not that many companies are trying to do so these days. After years of revision, the administration announced final rules late last week that require companies working in the offshore Arctic to put in place new safety...

  • Science proves it: Girl Scouts really do make the world a better place

    Science proves it: Girl Scouts really do make the world a better place

    For decades, Girl Scouts have pledged to make the world a better place. Now there’s scientific proof that they do. After completing five hourlong courses on energy conservation, Junior-level Girl Scouts boosted their households’ energy-saving activities by as much as 49%, according to a study published...

  • Downtown L.A.'s five-year rain total is lowest ever recorded

    Downtown L.A.'s five-year rain total is lowest ever recorded

    Los Angeles has chalked up yet another dreary milestone in its growing almanac of drought. On Wednesday, experts at the National Weather Service confirmed that the last five years have been the driest ever documented in downtown L.A. since official record keeping began almost 140 years ago.  Having...

  • California should take the lead on protecting tropical forests

    California should take the lead on protecting tropical forests

    In Sacramento, an opportunity is pending that could make a huge difference to achieving climate stability and sustainable development goals on a global scale. California could take the lead in demonstrating an innovative approach to reducing tropical deforestation. And the benefits would accrue...

  • AQMD plan would fight smog mainly through incentives, not rules

    AQMD plan would fight smog mainly through incentives, not rules

    For decades, regulators have attacked Southern California’s notorious smog through an ever-stricter array of regulations that forced polluters to deploy cleaner technology. But a plan released Thursday by the South Coast Air Quality Management District takes a more industry-friendly approach. It...

  • Another heat wave expected to hit region, hindering Kern County fire fight

    Another heat wave expected to hit region, hindering Kern County fire fight

    Another unseasonable heat wave was expected to hit Southern California early this week, complicating efforts to contain the massive wildfire raging in Kern County, forecasters said.  Temperatures were expected to start rising across the region on Sunday, caused by a high pressure system coming...

  • Wildfire burns more than 30,000 acres, prompting state of emergency; 2 dead, 100 structures lost

    Wildfire burns more than 30,000 acres, prompting state of emergency; 2 dead, 100 structures lost

    Fire officials confirmed two fatalities Friday in a fast-moving fire near Lake Isabella that has scorched more than 30,000 acres and destroyed 100 structures. As of Friday evening, the blaze was 5% contained. Gov. Jerry Brown issued a state of emergency for Kern County, a move that helps more quickly...

  • What drought? Many Californians no longer required to curb water use

    What drought? Many Californians no longer required to curb water use

    After a year of mandatory water conservation that shortened showers and faded lawns, millions of drought-weary Californians will no longer be required to aggressively cut back their use. In order to comply with the state’s latest emergency regulation, local water providers this week submitted documents...

  • Red flag conditions ahead for Southern California amid several wildfires

    Red flag conditions ahead for Southern California amid several wildfires

    A short respite from triple-digit heat allowed crews battling several wildfires in Southern California to block the flames from destroying homes this week, but dangerous red flag fire conditions have returned, the National Weather Service said Thursday. Temperatures in the Los Angeles, Ventura...

  • It will take years of wet weather before California recovers from drought, study finds

    It will take years of wet weather before California recovers from drought, study finds

    When forecasters last year warned of a massive El Niño, some Californians held out hope that a single extremely wet year could bust the state’s severe drought.    But a study published Tuesday in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union, offered support for the...

  • Heat wave shatters temperature records across Southern California

    Heat wave shatters temperature records across Southern California

    A sweltering heat wave baked Southern California on Sunday, bringing triple-digit temperatures to some areas and shattering records that in some cases held for decades. The National Weather Service issued a list of record-setting temperatures in cities across the Southland. Here’s a selection: ...

  • Temperatures soar as Southern California's heat wave intensifies

    Temperatures soar as Southern California's heat wave intensifies

    High temperatures are expected to continue Sunday as Southern California’s heat wave intensifies, according to the National Weather Service.  Forecasters say the weather system that has been building over Southern California is strengthening and will cause temperatures to keep climbing higher. ...

  • Rare toads (presumably) love him; off-roaders do not

    Rare toads (presumably) love him; off-roaders do not

    Cantankerous outlaws and merciless nature are out to kill the arroyo toads of Santa Barbara and Ventura counties. Like an ecological John Wayne, Sam Sweet — a big man with a beard and ponytail who at one point in his controversial career packed a .44 magnum — has spent his life trying to protect...

  • Supreme Court rejects citizenship for American Samoans

    Supreme Court rejects citizenship for American Samoans

    The Supreme Court turned down an appeal on Monday from American Samoans who said they deserved the right to be U.S. citizens at birth. The court’s action leaves in place a law adopted in 1900 that says persons born in American Samoa will be considered “nationals” who owe allegiance to the United...

  • Portland unnerved by discovery of high lead levels in school drinking water

    Portland unnerved by discovery of high lead levels in school drinking water

    Communities across the U.S. have been testing their water in the wake of a lead contamination crisis in Flint, Mich., and for the most part, the results have seemed reassuring, with many cities declaring their water safe to drink. One exception has been a city that has always prided itself on its...

  • Crackdown on archdiocese-owned oil field near USC gets OK, city attorney says

    Crackdown on archdiocese-owned oil field near USC gets OK, city attorney says

    An oil field near USC that neighbors have long accused of causing health problems ranging from nosebleeds to serious respiratory illness must remain closed permanently or comply with stringent regulations, Los Angeles City Atty. Mike Feuer told The Times on Wednesday.  The two-acre field, operated...

  • Water conservation has saved energy, cut greenhouse gas emissions, study finds

    Water conservation has saved energy, cut greenhouse gas emissions, study finds

    As debate continues in San Diego County and around the state over how aggressively to conserve water amid a historic drought, a new study finds that reductions in urban water use have saved significant amounts of electricity and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. The analysis, published by UC Davis,...

  • AQMD board opposes bill to add 'environmental justice' members and urges feds to clean up truck emissions

    AQMD board opposes bill to add 'environmental justice' members and urges feds to clean up truck emissions

    Southern California’s air quality board has come under criticism for a political shift that critics say has made it too friendly to polluting industries. Earlier this week, the state Senate approved a bill aimed at changing the balance. On Friday, the South Coast Air Quality Management District...

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