Lifestyle

Recipe: Baby artichoke and pea shoot salad with favas and pecorino Romano

 

Total time: 30 minutes, plus shelling and hulling time

Servings: 4

8 baby artichokes

Juice of 2 lemons plus 2 tablespoons, divided

Salt

1 1/2 cups shelled and hulled fava beans

Freshly ground black pepper to taste

1/4 cup top-quality extra virgin olive oil

6 ounces pea shoots (about 7 cups)

2 ounces shaved pecorino Romano

1. Trim the outer leaves of the artichokes down to the tender yellow-green centers. Slice off the tops and bottoms of the artichokes and trim the bottoms to remove any green parts. Cut the artichokes in half lengthwise and then into paper-thin slices. Immediately plunge the slices into a bowl of cold water acidulated with the juice of 2 lemons.

2. Bring a small saucepan of water to a rolling boil. Add the salt and return to a boil. Add the favas and blanch for 30 seconds. Immediately drain and run the favas under cold water to stop cooking. Set aside.

3. In a small bowl, whisk the remaining 2 tablespoons lemon juice with salt and pepper to taste. Add the olive oil and whisk until emulsified.

4. Place the pea shoots in a salad bowl, tearing any large ones into bite-size segments. Add the fava beans. Drain the artichoke slices and pat dry, then add to the bowl. Toss to mix. Drizzle with enough dressing to coat and toss to mix, adding more dressing as needed.

5. To serve, divide the salad among serving plates and strew pecorino shavings over each.

Each serving: 315 calories; 14 grams protein; 31 grams carbohydrates; 10 grams fiber; 18 grams fat; 4 grams saturated fat; 10 mg. cholesterol; 338 mg. sodium.

Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times
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