Topics

Literature
'Water to the Angels' dives into L.A.'s water history
'Water to the Angels' dives into L.A.'s water history

"Cattle were starving on the ranches in Antelope Valley. Lake Elizabeth had dried into a mudflat, and by July the city was consuming more water than was flowing into the storage reservoirs," writes Les Standiford in "Water to the Angels." This was 1904, several years into a severe drought, when William Mulholland set out to survey the Owens Valley for new water. It's a disturbingly apt moment for a new book about the chief engineer of the Bureau of Water Works and Supply (later the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power), and his mission to bring water to a city with dwindling resources. William Mulholland's legacy looms large: From Mulholland Drive to...

Loading