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Baylor University
Texas scholar's work to ID immigrant corpses is gratifying — and sad
Texas scholar's work to ID immigrant corpses is gratifying — and sad

The forensic anthropologist lifted a thighbone from the skeleton arrayed on her metal lab table and studied the fine cracks traversing its surface, gray and weathered as driftwood. Associate professor Lori Baker, 44, set the bone down and cradled the man's skull, its silver canines gleaming. She pointed to the eye sockets; they had been pecked, probably by vultures. Baker had recovered the remains from a ranch near the Mexico border. Judging by the skeleton's size, shape and worn hip joints, she said, it probably belonged to a middle-aged Central American laborer. Last year, U.S. border officials saw a significant increase in migrant deaths to 463, the second-highest total in...

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