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March of Dimes Foundation
Review: 'Afternoon of a Faun' a graceful tale of ballet, loss
Review: 'Afternoon of a Faun' a graceful tale of ballet, loss

We open with two dancers, a man and a woman, on a bare stage. He is Jacques d'Amboise, one of the greatest male dancers this country ever produced, but you barely notice him. Your eye is drawn to the woman, to the fluid, almost miraculous way she moves, to a style you feel you've never seen before. You're looking at Tanaquil Le Clercq. That footage of the Jerome Robbins ballet that gives "Afternoon of a Faun: Tanaquil Le Clercq" its name is grainy and six decades old, but the dancer's power to intoxicate remains. No wonder Robbins and the New York City Ballet's George Balanchine fell in love with and choreographed significant ballets for her. And no...

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