National Transportation Safety Board

Despite an accident, hundreds still willing to gamble on riding driverless shuttle in Las Vegas

Despite an accident, hundreds still willing to gamble on riding driverless shuttle in Las Vegas

The small, blue shuttle drove defensively. Slowly. Piloted entirely by computer, it followed the rules of the road like a student driver trying to impress an instructor.

It approached the traffic signal, where it was set to turn right. On the corner, a pedestrian attempted to wave it on through before realizing there was no driver to heed his directive. The stalemate — politeness verses programming — was broken only when the light turned green and the shuttle could lawfully proceed.

Ben Johnson, the human attendant on board the Keolis shuttle, looked at the seven passengers. They were looking right back at him.

“It’s very cautious,” Johnson said.

That might be...

EDITION: California | U.S. & World
75°