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Richard Burr

Congress can put iPhones back within reach of law enforcement

Congress can put iPhones back within reach of law enforcement

The FBI paid six figures for a hacking tool to get into San Bernardino shooter Syed Rizwan Farook's iPhone 5c after Apple refused to unlock it.

That's one down, more than 1,000 lawfully seized phones to go.

As recently as 18 months ago, Apple and Google — whose operating systems run 96.7% of the world's smartphones — would comply with judicial orders to extract evidence from mobile devices and send the data to prosecutors. In 2014, however, the companies reengineered their operating systems to make their devices encrypted by default. They could no longer unlock their own products.

Since then, 230 inaccessible Apple devices have come into the Cyber Lab of...

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