71°

Topics

Marine Science
Mantis shrimp wear tinted shades to see UV light
Mantis shrimp wear tinted shades to see UV light

When you look at a mantis shrimp, you see a vivid lobster-like crustacean whose forearms can strike with the force of a .22-caliber bullet. But when a mantis shrimp looks at you, we have no idea what it sees. That’s because the mantis shrimp possesses one of the most complex eyeballs on the planet, an organ that allows it to perceive a rainbow of colors in both the visible and ultraviolet spectrum without the massive brainpower required for human vision. Now scientists are one step closer to understanding how mantis shrimp do it. In a new study published Thursday in the journal Current Biology, researchers report that that mantis shrimp use a set of filters to separate ultraviolet...

Loading