Frank Gehry wins Getty Trust's annual career achievement medal

Frank Gehry, pictured inside Walt Disney Concert Hall in 2013, has won this year's J. Paul Getty Medal for career contributions to visual art. (Wally Skalij/Los Angeles Times)

Frank Gehry is this year’s recipient of the J. Paul Getty Medal, the Getty Trust’s annual award for leadership in visual art.

Frank Gehry is this year’s recipient of the J. Paul Getty Medal, the Getty Trust’s annual award for leadership in visual art.

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Frank Gehry is this year’s recipient of the J. Paul Getty Medal, the Getty Trust’s annual award for leadership in visual art.

Frank Gehry is this year’s recipient of the J. Paul Getty Medal, the Getty Trust’s annual award for leadership in visual art.

Frank Gehry is this year’s recipient of the J. Paul Getty Medal, the Getty Trust’s annual award for leadership in visual art.

Frank Gehry is this year’s recipient of the J. Paul Getty Medal, the Getty Trust’s annual award for leadership in visual art.

Frank Gehry is this year’s recipient of the J. Paul Getty Medal, the Getty Trust’s annual award for leadership in visual art.

Gehry’s most celebrated buildings in L.A. include Walt Disney Concert Hall, whose billowing form was realized using pioneering computerized design techniques; the playful 1980s “binoculars building” in Venice that sports giant decorative binoculars designed by husband-and-wife artists Claes Oldenberg and Coosje van Bruggen and is now leased by Google; and Gehry’s own home in Santa Monica. There, the renovations he made in 1978 using inelegant materials such as chain link fencing, corrugated metal and plywood were at first widely derided, then recognized as groundbreaking.

Gehry’s most celebrated buildings in L.A. include Walt Disney Concert Hall, whose billowing form was realized using pioneering computerized design techniques; the playful 1980s “binoculars building” in Venice that sports giant decorative binoculars designed by husband-and-wife artists Claes Oldenberg and Coosje van Bruggen and is now leased by Google; and Gehry’s own home in Santa Monica. There, the renovations he made in 1978 using inelegant materials such as chain link fencing, corrugated metal and plywood were at first widely derided, then recognized as groundbreaking.

Gehry’s most celebrated buildings in L.A. include Walt Disney Concert Hall, whose billowing form was realized using pioneering computerized design techniques; the playful 1980s “binoculars building” in Venice that sports giant decorative binoculars designed by husband-and-wife artists Claes Oldenberg and Coosje van Bruggen and is now leased by Google; and Gehry’s own home in Santa Monica. There, the renovations he made in 1978 using inelegant materials such as chain link fencing, corrugated metal and plywood were at first widely derided, then recognized as groundbreaking.

Gehry’s most celebrated buildings in L.A. include Walt Disney Concert Hall, whose billowing form was realized using pioneering computerized design techniques; the playful 1980s “binoculars building” in Venice that sports giant decorative binoculars designed by husband-and-wife artists Claes Oldenberg and Coosje van Bruggen and is now leased by Google; and Gehry’s own home in Santa Monica. There, the renovations he made in 1978 using inelegant materials such as chain link fencing, corrugated metal and plywood were at first widely derided, then recognized as groundbreaking.

Gehry’s most celebrated buildings in L.A. include Walt Disney Concert Hall, whose billowing form was realized using pioneering computerized design techniques; the playful 1980s “binoculars building” in Venice that sports giant decorative binoculars designed by husband-and-wife artists Claes Oldenberg and Coosje van Bruggen and is now leased by Google; and Gehry’s own home in Santa Monica. There, the renovations he made in 1978 using inelegant materials such as chain link fencing, corrugated metal and plywood were at first widely derided, then recognized as groundbreaking.

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Gehry’s most celebrated buildings in L.A. include Walt Disney Concert Hall, whose billowing form was realized using pioneering computerized design techniques; the playful 1980s “binoculars building” in Venice that sports giant decorative binoculars designed by husband-and-wife artists Claes Oldenberg and Coosje van Bruggen and is now leased by Google; and Gehry’s own home in Santa Monica. There, the renovations he made in 1978 using inelegant materials such as chain link fencing, corrugated metal and plywood were at first widely derided, then recognized as groundbreaking.

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