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Angelina Jolie: Marriage feels 'different'; she's 'open' to politics

Angelina Jolie: Marriage feels 'different'; she's 'open' to politics
Angelina Jolie -- Vanity Fair's woman of the year -- poses on the cover of the December 2014 issue of the magazine. (Mario Testino / Vanity Fair)

Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt are making marriage look good: The Oscar winner recently admitted that being married to the father of her six adopted and biological children feels "different" -- in a positive way.

The "Girl, Interrupted" Oscar winner opens up about her 3-month-old marriage to the "Fury" star in the December issue of Vanity Fair, which dubs her its woman of the year.

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"It does feel different," the "Unbroken" director said. "It feels nice to be husband and wife."

The power pair, who have been romantically linked since their 2005 film "Mr. & Mrs. Smith," had a surprise wedding at their Chateau Miraval in the south of France in August. Their kids played a large part in the pomp, helping design their mother's Atelier Versace gown and veil and penning their parents' vows.

"They did not expect us never to fight, but they made us promise to always say, 'Sorry,' if we do," Jolie shared in the mag. "So they said, 'Do you?,' and we said, 'We do!' "

After the nuptials, the newlyweds jetted off for what Pitt called their "dysfunctional honeymoon" in Malta, because that's where they're currently filming "By the Sea" -- a drama in which he and his wife share the screen for the first time since "Mr. & Mrs. Smith." Jolie is also directing the film.

"A few friends asked if we were crazy ... [A film about] a married couple going through some difficulties ... and I'm directing him," she noted.

The stunning United Nations goodwill ambassador is photographed by Mario Testino on the cover wearing a crisp white shirt. She also discusses her potential political aspirations with writer Janine Di Giovanni. The actress, who was recently named an honorary dame by Queen Elizabeth II for her humanitarian work, has been a global advocate for refugees and victims of war-zone sexual violence, so a career in politics would appear to be a natural next step.

"When you work as a humanitarian, you are conscious that politics have to be considered," the actress said. "Because if you really want to make an extreme change, then you have a responsibility. ... But I honestly don't know in what role I would be more useful -- I am conscious of what I do for a living, and that [could] make it less possible."

When prompted again about pursuing a life in appointed office, diplomacy or public service, the 39-year-old said: "I am open."

Jolie's full interview will be available for digital download Thursday, and the December issue hits newsstands Nov. 11.

We're open too. Follow me on Twitter @NardineSaad.

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