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Lily Rabe to star in 'Miss Julie' at Geffen Playhouse

Long IslandNeil LaButeThe Mindy Project (tv program)Chris MessinaAmerican Horror Story (tv program)George Bernard ShawCentral Park

Lily Rabe, who has earned acclaim for her New York stage performances and whose Hollywood cachet has risen thanks to the popularity of the FX series "American Horror Story," will star in a new adaptation of August Strindberg's "Miss Julie" at the Geffen Playhouse.

"Miss Julie" is scheduled to open May 1 and will have a limited run through June 2. The classic 19th century play has been adapted by Neil LaBute and will be directed by Jo Bonney.

Rabe will play Strindberg's heroine, the daughter of a wealthy aristocratic type. Laura Heisner will take the role of Kristine, a lowly cook in the household. Chris Messina, who currently appears in Fox's "The Mindy Project," will round out the cast in the role of John, an ambitious manservant.

LaBute's adaptation of the play moves the action to ritzy Long Island shortly before the 1929 stock market crash.

Preview performances of the Geffen's "Miss Julie" are scheduled to begin April 23.

Rabe won acclaim for her performance in the Public Theatre's production of Shakespeare's "The Merchant of Venice" alongside Al Pacino, which opened in New York's Central Park before transferring to Broadway in 2010.

She played Rosalind this summer in the Public's production of "As You Like It."

Her other Broadway credits include Theresa Rebeck's "Seminar" in 2011 and George Bernard Shaw's "Heartbreak House" in 2006.

The actress is the daughter of playwright David Rabe and the late Jill Clayburgh. She recently signed on for the third season of "American Horror Story."

In other Strindberg news this week, it was announced that Liv Ullmann will direct a new film adaptation of "Miss Julie" with Jessica Chastain in the title role.

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