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The Emmy Awards have wrapped. "Big Little Lies" was a big winner along with Donald Glover, "Saturday Night Live" and "The Handmaid's Tale." Lena Waithe made history as the first black woman to win for writing in a comedy series, "Handmaid's" was the first streaming show to win drama, and Donald Glover was the first black man to win directing in comedy. Check out our behind-the-scenes stories, fashion breakdowns and red carpet interviews.

It wasn't just Sean Spicer: How Donald Glover, Lena Waithe and, yes, Julia Louis-Dreyfus made Emmys history

Reed Morano is the second woman to win a directing Emmy. She got the nod for "The Handmaid's Tale." (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)
Reed Morano is the second woman to win a directing Emmy. She got the nod for "The Handmaid's Tale." (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

This year’s Emmys were memorable for a number of reasons, and not just for Anna Chlumsky’s shocked reaction when Sean Spicer rolled that lectern onstage.

Donald Glover, the multi-hyphenate behind FX’s groundbreaking comedy “Atlanta,” became the first black director to win an Emmy for comedy direction. Glover won for “B.A.N.,” an experimental stand-alone episode set in “Atlanta’s” alternate-universe Black Entertainment Television. It was one of the first-year series’ best episodes, blistering in its honest and funny look at race, outrage culture and black masculinity.

"Atlanta's" Donald Glover is the first black director to win an Emmy and is only the second black man to win lead actor in a comedy. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)
"Atlanta's" Donald Glover is the first black director to win an Emmy and is only the second black man to win lead actor in a comedy. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

Glover also won the Emmy for lead actor in a comedy, becoming just the second black man to take that award. Robert Guillaume won for “Benson” in 1985.

Lena Waithe, the first black woman ever nominated for comedy writing, took that Emmy for the “Master of None” episode “Thanksgiving,” which she co-wrote with series creator Aziz Ansari. The episode’s story, inspired by Waithe’s own life, followed her character, Denise, discovering her sexuality over the course of her life and finally revealing it to her mother.

Lena Waithe, the first black woman nominated for comedy writing, took the Emmy for co-writing the “Master of None” episode “Thanksgiving.” (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)
Lena Waithe, the first black woman nominated for comedy writing, took the Emmy for co-writing the “Master of None” episode “Thanksgiving.” (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

“I had survived that thing that I was so afraid of,” Waithe told The Times of her coming-out experience.

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