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Watch Jimmy Kimmel dupe juice lovers into drinking Tang, liquid Skittles

Video: Jimmy Kimmel show gives people Skittles blended with water, says it's cold-pressed juice dubbed 'jüce'

"It's awards season, so of course I'm on a juice cleanse." 

"My ex-boyfriend is getting married, I have to juice." 

"I'm so hung over right now. I have to juice today." 

If you live in Los Angeles, chances are you've heard those exact words, or something similar, and probably more than once. When a friend cancels dinner plans because she's on a new juice cleanse, disappointed doesn't come close to describing your true feelings.  

Recognizing the cold-pressed juice craze, late-night talk show host Jimmy Kimmel decided to create his own juice company "jüce," and have one of his minions sample his fake products at the Original Farmers Market. 

"Here in L.A., we are always obsessed with the latest food trends and there are a lot of them," said Kimmel on a recent episode of his show. "To lose weight, people are drinking butter in their coffee. It's crazy. But maybe even crazier are all the cold-pressed juice stores I see popping up." 

The show created its own sample booth at the farmers market and gave unsuspecting samplers four types of "juice." You can view the full clip above. 

"Soul" juice was made with Fun Dip powdered candy and water. Tang powder was mixed with water to create "Cure." Creamsicles were melted and labeled "Detox." Skittles were put in a blender with water to create "Rainbow."

"We're here with our line of cold-pressed, natural, extraordinarily expensive beverages," says the faux "jüce" representative in the video. "Does that sound appealing to you?" 

"That sounds appealing," replied a young man at the market. "That sounds very appealing." 

He then sampled the Fun Dip mixed with water and described it as "cleansing."

"Deep breath, refreshing," a young woman who also tasted the Soul juice. "It just feels like you drank something that is good for you." 

When the "jüce" employee asked one taste tester if "Cure"was worth its supposed $19 price tag, the tester replied, "Yes, your health is worth everything." 

We dare say this is even more entertaining than the time Kimmel asked unsuspecting Runyon Canyon hikers if they knew what gluten-free means. 

If you're looking for some real cold-press juice stores to visit, we've got a handy list here

When I'm squeezing oranges, I make sure my hands are really cold. Follow me on Twitter @Jenn_Harris_

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