Louis Watson, Dwight Taylor and Gregory Davis Jr. were the first casualties of the L.A. riots, mortally wounded in a volley of gunfire early on the evening of April 29, 1992.

Over the last 20 years, police detectives and family members have tried to imagine what exactly happened near Vernon and Vermont avenues. They know it was a chaotic moment. Police believe all three were innocent victims, but they were surrounded by a mob looting a large swap meet at the corner.

For The Record
Los Angeles Times Saturday, May 05, 2012 Home Edition Main News Part A Page 4 News Desk 1 inches; 47 words Type of Material: Correction
Unsolved riot homicides: In some copies of the May 3 Section A, a map accompanying an article about unsolved homicides that occurred during the 1992 riots placed Los Angeles International Airport slightly south of its actual location. A corrected version of the map is online at www.latimes.com/riotunsolvedmap.

They can replay so much of the scene -- but not who pulled the trigger. Was it a gang member shooting randomly into a crowd? Was it somehow related to the looting going around them? Or did the gunman purposely target them?

Watson, Taylor and Davis were among 36 victims of riot-related homicides. Of those cases, 23 remain unsolved. But the deaths of the three are the only case the Los Angeles Police Department is still actively investigating.

In the months after the riots, police detectives told reporters they were optimistic about solving the cases. They talked of suspects and possible motives. But over time, all the trails went cold. They interviewed and re-interviewed witnesses. At one point, they closed in on someone they believed was a suspect, only to pull back and then develop a whole new theory about what happened.

In the beginning, family members eagerly awaited updates from detectives, and some even investigated on their own. But over time, they moved on.

Myiesha Taylor was a high school senior when her father, Dwight, a 42-year-old former Cal State Long Beach basketball star, was killed. She went to college at Xavier University in New Orleans thinking police had identified the gunman and that an arrest might be imminent. Now an emergency room doctor living in the Dallas area, she wonders if they will ever know who killed her father.

"I think the city owes it to the families to solve my father's killing and the killings of all those who lost their lives," she said.

Making connections

At first, there was little to connect the shootings. All three victims were rushed to different hospitals.

It took several days for detectives to determine they were shot at the same place and time. The case began getting media attention after the L.A. County coroner's office declared that Watson, 18, was the first person killed during the riots. His family said at the time that he was helping an elderly woman get on a bus just before the gunfire rang out.

At his funeral a few days later, some of his friends stormed out in the middle of the service, vowing revenge on whoever killed him. "Show Louis your respect," the pastor urged them, The Times reported. "If there is anybody here who feels like retaliating, forget it."

Detectives quickly concluded that Watson, Taylor and Davis, 15, had no connections and just happened to be at the wrong place at the wrong time. Taylor worked at a fish market in the area in a job that earned him the nickname "The Fishman" in the neighborhood. His family said Taylor was walking to get some milk and other groceries when he was gunned down.

Davis was a high school athlete who was at the intersection with his father.

In 1992, Los Angeles recorded the most homicides in its history -- 1,096 -- and detectives were working multiple cases in the months after the riots.

Detectives at the time praised Watson's father, Eric Fleming, for launching his own investigation and providing what they described as "crucial" evidence. A few days after the killings, Fleming surveyed the swap meet parking lot and found his son's bloody cap on the ground.

Some witnesses said they believed the bullet that hit Watson in the head bounced off a safe being hauled out by some looters.

By June, police said the leading theory was that the gunman was a gang member who had targeted Watson, and that Taylor and Davis were collateral damage.

Myiesha Taylor said detectives told her family that a woman had called police and said her son or his friend was bragging about a shooting.