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List Of Transplant Facilities Not Meeting Standards

To qualify for Medicare funding, the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services requires transplant centers to perform a certain number of transplants annually and achieve a specific unadjusted survival rate for patients one year after surgery. Transplant programs at the following hospitals failed to meet one or both of the standards.

Heart

Did fewer than the required 12 in 2005:

California: UC San Diego Medical Center, Sutter Memorial Hospital in Sacramento, Sharp Memorial Hospital in San Diego, St. Vincent Medical Center in Los Angeles

Connecticut: Hartford Hospital

Washington, D.C.: Washington Hospital Center

Florida: St. Luke's Hospital

Illinois: Rush University Medical Center, OSF St. Francis Medical Center

Indiana: Lutheran Hospital of Fort Wayne

Iowa: University of Iowa Hospital and Clinics

Kansas: Via Christi Regional Medical Center

Kentucky: University of Kentucky Medical Center

Louisiana: Tulane University Medical Center

Massachusetts: Massachusetts General Hospital

Michigan: Henry Ford Hospital

Minnesota: Abbot Northwestern Hospital

Missouri: St. Louis University Hospital

Mississippi: University of Mississippi Medical Center

Nebraska: BryanLGH Medical Center East

New Jersey: Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital

New York: Montefiore Medical Center

Ohio: Ohio State University Hospital (see note below)

Oklahoma: St. Francis Hospital

Pennsylvania: Allegheny General Hospital, Hahnemann University Hospital

Texas: Seton Medical Center, Methodist Specialty & Transplant Hospital, Christus Santa Rosa Medical Center

Virginia: Inova Fairfax Hospital, MCV Hospitals

Had a survival rate of less than the required 73%*:

Connecticut: Yale New Haven Hospital

Ohio: University Of Cincinnati Medical Center

Failed both standards:

Indiana: St. Vincent Hospital and Health Care Center

North Carolina: Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center

Lung

Did fewer than the required 10 transplants in 2005:

Arizona: University Medical Center at the University of Arizona

Florida: Jackson Memorial Hospital (see note below)

Massachusetts: Massachusetts General Hospital

Michigan: Henry Ford Hospital

New York: Mount Sinai Medical Center

Had a survival rate less than the required 69%*:Georgia: Emory University Hospital

Maryland: Johns Hopkins Hospital

Failed both standards:

Utah: University Of Utah Health Sciences Center

Liver

Did fewer than the required 12 transplants in 2005:

Massachusetts: UMass Memorial Medical Center (see note below)

Pennsylvania: Hahnemann University Hospital (see note below)

Had a survival rate of less than the required 77%*:

California: USC University Hospital

Hawaii: St. Francis Medical Center

Maryland: Johns Hopkins Hospital

Ohio: Ohio State University Hospital

*Survival rates are based on the one-year survival of heart and lung patients who received their first transplant from July 2002 to December 2004, and liver patients from January 2003 to June 2005.

Notes:

The heart transplant program at Ohio State University Hospital performed 11 solo transplants last year, one shy of the federal standard. But that figure does not include a heart-lung transplant performed at the hospital last year, which would bring it into compliance. (The heart-lung statistics are kept separately by the national transplant network and were not included in The Times' figures.)

The lung transplant program at Jackson Memorial Hospital performed nine solo transplants last year, one shy of the federal standard. But that figure does not include two heart-lung operations performed at the hospital last year, which would bring it into compliance. (The heart-lung statistics are kept separately by the national transplant network and were not included in The Times' figures.)

The liver transplant programs at UMass Memorial Medical Center and Hahnemann University Hospital each performed 11 solo transplants last year, one shy of the federal standard. But that figure does not include two liver-kidney transplants performed at each hospital last year, which would bring them into compliance. (The liver-kidney statistics are kept separately by the national transplant network and were not included in The Times' figures.)

Source: United Network for Organ Sharing (www.unos.org) and the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (www.ustransplant.org).

Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times
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