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  • Snail-hunting for the sake of science: The good, the bad and the slimy

    Snail-hunting for the sake of science: The good, the bad and the slimy

    It's hard for most people to get psyched about snails. They're slimy. Their bodies bear a strong resemblance to phlegm. And our encounters with them often involve cursing the damage they do to our gardens. But after spending a few hours among snail enthusiasts at the first-ever SnailBlitz, one's...

  • Real-world doctors fact-check Dr. Oz, and the results aren't pretty

    Real-world doctors fact-check Dr. Oz, and the results aren't pretty

    What do real-world doctors have to say about the advice dispensed on “The Dr. Oz Show”? Less than one-third of it can be backed up by even modest medical evidence. If that sounds alarming, consider this: Nearly 4 in 10 of the assertions made on the hit show appear to be made on the basis of no...

  • Vaccine refusal helped fuel Disneyland measles outbreak, study says

    Vaccine refusal helped fuel Disneyland measles outbreak, study says

    Although epidemiologists have not yet identified the person who brought measles to Disneyland, a new analysis shows that the highly contagious disease has spread to seven states and two other countries thanks to parents who declined to vaccinate their children. Using some simple math, a team of...

  • About half of kids' learning ability is in their DNA, study says

    About half of kids' learning ability is in their DNA, study says

    You may think you’re better at reading than you are at math (or vice versa), but new research suggests you’re probably equally good (or bad) at both. The reason: The genes that determine a person’s ability to tackle one subject influence their aptitude at the other, accounting for about half of...

  • Tibetans get high-altitude edge from extinct Denisovans' genes

    Tibetans get high-altitude edge from extinct Denisovans' genes

    Forget climbing Mt. Everest — for most humans, just eking out a living on the harsh Tibetan plateau is challenge enough. But Tibetan people have thrived there for thousands of years, and a new study says it's thanks to a genetic adaptation they inherited from an ancient human relative. The study...

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