Kris Bryant called up by Chicago Cubs, strikes out in first at-bat

Kris Bryant says call up to majors a 'dream come true'

Despite all the talk that the Chicago Cubs were failing to do the right thing by sending top prospect Kris Bryant to the minor leagues for the first 12 days of the 2015 season, the 23-year-old doesn't appear to harbor any ill will toward his employer. 

"Today I got to tell my family that my dream is coming true," Bryant tweeted Thursday night. "Can't really put into words what that feels like. So excited for this journey!"

Bryant hit .425 with nine home runs in spring training and his ability to play at the major league level was never questioned. The Cubs simply had to make business decision.

If Bryant had spent at least 172 days as part of the Cubs' 25-man roster he would have become a free agent in 2020. However, by letting him spend 12 days up front in triple-A, his free agency has been delayed an entire year because of the language in the league's collective bargaining agreement.

While Bryant hasn't been present at Wrigley Field, which is still missing its bleacher seats while a massive renovation is taking place, his image has been plastered on a billboard across the street.

"Worth The Wait," an ad by Adidas says over the top of a photo of Bryant.

"I sure hope I can look back on this and laugh at it 15 years from now,” Bryant told the Associated Press. "It's all in the past."

Now that the business of baseball is over, Bryant can get back to the game of baseball.

The Cubs opened up a three-game series against the San Diego Padres on Friday in which Bryant, who will take third baseman Mike Olt's place on the roster, made his big league debut and bat cleanup.

In his first career at-bat, after sleeping just three hours the night before, Padres pitcher James Shields struck Bryant out with three pitches.

Follow Matt Wilhalme on Twitter @mattwilhalme

Copyright © 2016, Los Angeles Times

UPDATES

11:52 a.m.: Adds quote from Bryant and information about his first career at-bat.

This story was originally published at 8 a.m.

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