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Inside the Festival of Books with David Ulin and Carolyn Kellogg [Live chat]

Arts and Culture

 

On Tuesday, join L.A. Times book critic David L. Ulin and me, Carolyn Kellogg, for a video chat about the L.A. Times Festival of Books. The festival takes place the weekend of April 20-21 on the USC campus, and we'll be bringing you our insiders' preview.

We'll try to share some of the insights we've accrued over the years -- for instance, we hope it'll be sunny, but not too sunny. And we'll talk about what's new this year.

And we'll talk about the festival's many discussions and readings: what we're looking forward to and what we're upset that we're missing because it's hard to get to one panel when you're moderating another.

INTERACTIVE MAP: Literary L.A.

David will be moderating a panel with Rachel Kushner, Jonathan Lethem and Marisa Silver on the social novel at noon that Saturday. And Sunday at noon, I'll be moderating a conversation between Molly Ringwald ("When It Happens to You") and Maria Semple ("Where'd You Go, Bernadette").

On Spreecast, you can join us to chat about what you've got tickets for and which authors you might get to sign their books, and to ask questions about the panels and writers in attendance.

We'll also discuss the L.A. Times Book Prizes, which will be given out Friday, April 19. Margaret Atwood will receive the Innovators' Award, and scholar Kevin Starr will be presented with the Robert Kirsch Award. The winners in 10 categories will be announced at the ceremony, which is being held at USC's Bovard Auditorium; tickets are $10.

As we enter the final days before the festival, we're curious to hear what you're curious about. Just don't ask us about parking -- there, we're pretty clueless.

ALSO:

Keeping up with Kevin Starr

Rachel Kushner lights a fire in 'The Flamethrowers'

Rated F? Non-kids' book 'Go the ... to Sleep' could become film

 

Carolyn Kellogg: Join me on Twitter, Facebook and Google+

Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times
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