FoodDaily Dish

Twisted Sage Cafe is for lovers of bacon and fat breakfast burritos

Dining and DrinkingLifestyle and LeisureRestaurants

Name of restaurant: Twisted Sage Café in San Dimas

Chef: Jolyn Thompson. After attending culinary school, Thompson worked at various restaurants around Southern California. She opened Twisted Sage Café in 2011.

What dish represents the restaurant and why? "Not Your Mom’s" biscuits and gravy. The hearty biscuits (more like corn bread) are made with bacon, scallions and cheddar and then topped with thick, homemade sage-sausage gravy.

Not enough pork on the table? The hefty bread pudding is topped with crunchy bits of candied maple bacon and can be ordered at breakfast or as a dessert for lunch.

Other breakfast options include build-your-own omelets, a croissant sandwich and gloriously overstuffed breakfast burritos. You can always keep it simple with the bacon waffle, which is exactly that -- thick pieces of bacon cooked inside a crispy waffle. There’s oatmeal too.

Concept: A casual, family-owned café with both indoor and outdoor seating that provides breakfast and lunch at affordable prices. Twisted Sage also offers pre-order and delivery. The breakfast and lunch items are served all day (6 a.m. to 3 p.m.).

Who's at the next table? A family celebrating a birthday, a group of teens sharing several dishes, more families.

Appropriate for...: Everyone. 

Uh-oh...: The killer biscuits and gravy are not on the regular menu. Call ahead to make sure they’re available that day.

Service: Friendly and fast.

What are you drinking? Coffee.

Info: Twisted Sage Cafe and Catering, 433 E. Foothill Blvd., San Dimas, (909) 305-0724, twistedsagecafe.com. Open 6 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily.

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The Scouting Report is a quick look at restaurants worth a visit. Scouts were selected by restaurant critic Jonathan Gold, who may or may not agree with a single word.

Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times
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