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THE ENVELOPE Hollywood's Awards and Industry Insider
Emmy chat: Join Titus Welliver, a.k.a. 'Bosch,' on Thursday

Until a few months ago, Hieronymus "Harry" Bosch, the veteran LAPD detective with an unshakable code of justice and ethics, had worked his cases only on the pages of a series of best-selling novels by former Los Angeles Times reporter Michael Connelly.

Connelly was always certain that the no-nonsense investigator would be a success on screen. But even he was overwhelmed by the instant success of "Bosch," Amazon Prime's drama featuring the detective that launched in February. Praised by critics and viewers, "Bosch" became the first dramatic series to be renewed on the digital on-demand service for a second season.

The author and others have given much of the credit for the breakthrough of "Bosch" to star Titus Welliver, who brings a haunted gravitas to the character.  The series marks the first leading man role for Welliver, a veteran actor whose credits include "Lost," "Sons of Anarchy," "The Good Wife" and "Argo."

Welliver will be stopping by The Times on Thursday at 11 a.m. PDT to talk...

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Emmy Contenders: Can 'Portlandia's' Fred Armisen be the voice of traffic app Waze?

We wish the timing had been a little better, so we could visit "Portlandia" star Fred Armisen in Portland, Ore., like this guy did, waiting way too long for a hipster to make our coffee and grilled cheese sandwich and driving around in a vintage Saab.

But we got the next best thing: Armisen dropping by the Los Angeles Times for a video chat during which he shared his love for Paul Reubens and "The Simpsons" and the joys of working alongside "Sesame Street's" Oscar the Grouch.

"You feel yourself become this little kid, you're like, you're talking to Oscar the Grouch," Armisen says. "Now I'm realizing what a cool character that was. He lived in a trash can. He was the punk of that whole organization."

There were a multitude of questions raised during the interview -- many from Armisen himself, who pondered whether Earth should preemptively remove itself from the list of planets, what exactly did Grover represent on "Sesame Street," whether it's possible to hate the Eagles but love Joe Walsh,...

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Emmy Contenders: Timothy Simons on 'Veep,' insults, awkward moments

As Jonah or Jonad or the guy people don't have the time to ignore or the man with the face of a police sketch rapist, Timothy Simons must endure all manner of devastating insults and put-downs on "Veep." And yet our favorite man on Capitol Hill just keeps picking himself up off the mat and coming back for more. And that's why we love him. Or loathe him. It kind of depends on the moment.

Simons stopped by The Times recently to talk about his work on "Veep" and how it feels when the writing staff decides to home in on a particular detail of his appearance for a joke, like the whole police sketch thing.

"It's weird because it's just my face," Simons says. "I don't have a different face than that, so when the writers wrote that, they were thinking about my face. That's a little arrow you got to pull out."

We also discussed the physical abuse Jonah had to endure at the hands of Patton Oswalt's character this season, a development that Simons says made for great comedy ("Jonah is an imperfect...

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Show runners: Watch video of a chat on TV viewing, challenges and more

The Envelope called upon some of television's most distinguished show runners to take some time out from their hectic schedules to talk about the industry's shifting landscape.

Joining this year's Emmy Roundtable were Robert King (co-creator with his wife, Michelle, of CBS’ “The Good Wife”), Mark Duplass (co-creator with his brother, Jay, of HBO’s “Togetherness”), Jill Soloway (Amazon’s “Transparent”), John Ridley (ABC’s “American Crime”) and Peter Gould (co-creator with Vince Gilligan of AMC’s “Better Call Saul”).

The group noted that the increasing variety of viewing platforms allows creators to focus on the storytelling aspect of television rather than a show's ratings, and how the expansion of programming sources grants them more room for exploration and creativity.

Ridley noted that the added outlets don't necessarily mean a more competitive landscape but often increased support and creativity. “I don’t want to say the competition has changed because when all of these spaces are making...

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Emmy chat: Join 'Veep's' Jonah, Timothy Simons, on Wednesday

As Jonah or Jonad or the guy people don't have the time to ignore or the man with the police sketch face of a rapist, Timothy Simons must endure all manner of devastating insults and putdowns on "Veep." And yet, our favorite man on Capitol Hill just keeps picking himself up off the mat and coming back for more. And that's why we love him. Or loathe him. It kind of depends on the moment.

Simons will be stopping by The Times on Wednesday at 11 a.m. PDT to talk about his work on "Veep" and why viewers connect so strongly with Jonah. There's also the matter of Patton Oswalt as the vice president’s chief of staff and the rather hands-on approach he took toward Jonah this season. Usually, seeing Oswalt in any form (movies, TV, stand-up) is a good thing. But after these intimate moments together, we're wondering if Simons would still agree.

So join us Wednesday. And if you have any questions you'd like to send Simons' way, tweet it to us using the hashtag #askLATimes.

Twitter: @glennwhipp

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Emmy Contenders: Constance Wu talks 'Fresh Off the Boat'

The art of comic timing? Constance Wu can deliver a master class. Thoughts on how to best serve the Asian American community? She's got you. The proper care and feeding of bunny rabbits? Wu could (and should) write a book.

The 33-year-old actress, who plays the zealous mom in the ABC comedy "Fresh Off the Boat," stopped by The Times recently to talk about all of the above and, of course, her work on the first-year show.

"She wants to fit in, but in her own way, just like her son wants to fit in," Wu says of her character. "And that's what I think is cool. It explores the different ways we all sort of are trying to find our tribe. That's a very specifically Asian American thing, but it's also a very human thing."

Wu offered thoughts about the scrutiny "Fresh Off the Boat" has received, as well as what she learned from spending time with the real-life woman on whom her character is based. And, yes, we learned a lot about rabbits.

"Some people have asked me if you weren't an actor, what would...

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