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On boxing's biggest stage, Pacquiao recalls how far he's come

Manny Pacquiao discusses his road from sleeping in the street as a child to the fight of his life

Manny Pacquiao came to the news conference for the fight of his life and was touched by the journey traveled.

“The most important thing is to let the people know how I went from nothing to something,” Pacquiao said. “I was sleeping in the street. Nothing. I cannot imagine that a boy could go from sleeping in the street, looking for food, starving, to be known to the Philippines -- not just in the Philippines -- but to the world.

“It’s beyond my imagination.”

Record eight-division world champion Pacquiao (57-5-2, 38 knockouts) will fight unbeaten Floyd Mayweather Jr. (47-0) on Saturday night at MGM Grand in a bout between the world’s top two pound-for-pound boxers that will shatter boxing revenue records.

“I feel I’m the one who really wanted this fight to happen,” Pacquiao said. “It’s a good thing that it’s happened now. The fans of boxing and the fans outside boxing want this. My interest in this fight, my love and eagerness for this fight, to show something as an underdog … that feeling ... it’s back and I’m so happy for that feeling. The fans deserve a good fight.”

Pacquiao said he’s confident he’s rediscovered the “killer instinct” that made him a devastating knockout artist and the fighter of the decade with destructions of Marco Antonio Barrera, Erik Morales, Oscar De La Hoya, Ricky Hatton and Miguel Cotto.

But he hasn’t knocked anyone out since stopping Cotto in 2009.

“The killer instinct -- the focus I have -- is back for my biggest fight,” Pacquiao said. “I’m relaxed, confident and it’s a good feeling.”

Read the Los Angeles Times’ special edition Flipboard digital magazine Mayweather vs. Pacquiao.

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