Costumed runners set their own records at L.A. Marathon

and Contact Reporter

There were some world records set Sunday at the Skechers Performance Los Angeles Marathon, but not the type that elite runners covet.

There was the fastest marathon by someone dressed as a car. Fastest marathon by someone dressed as a three-dimensional bird. And fastest marathon by someone wearing lederhosen.

“It’s exciting to see people who are so passionate about things get to achieve their dreams,” said Kaitlin Holl, records manager for Guinness Book of World Records.

Among the other winning categories were the fastest marathons by people dressed as a swimmer, boxer, tennis player, fast-food item (hot dog) and in pajamas.

Some of the attempts that failed were fastest marathons by runners dressed as a fisherman and postman. Also, one runner dressed as a tennis player beat the other.

“It’s a new partnership that we’re doing with the Guinness Book,” said Tracey Russell, chief executive of Conqur Endurance Group, which hosts the event. “We thought that with Los Angeles we have a really fun, vibrant community, and this was another way of lifting that.”

Teaming up

In their effort to make inroads with Los Angeles, the NFL’s Chargers hit the roads. They ran the race as a 13-member relay team, with team officials, cheerleaders and a player taking two miles each. The race started with General Manager Tom Telesco and his 14-year-old daughter, Elena, and ended with middle linebacker Denzel Perryman as the anchor.

“It’s just something fun to do, a chance for a lot of us to experience L.A. on the streets,” Telesco said.

Perryman ran with 7-year-old Asher Stewart, whose foot and lower leg problems in infancy led to his right leg being amputated when he was less than a year old.

“He ran a little over a mile,” his father, John Stewart, said. “With a smile on his face from ear to ear.”

Beginner’s luck

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti was a spectator Sunday, but has run a marathon before. He said he ran the Paris marathon several years ago, finishing in 3:41.

“I was younger,” he said. “I was rowing crew, and I had a bet with my roommate, who was a runner. I said, ‘Crew guys, we have the best lung capacity of any sport, along with cross-country skiers.’

“He said, ‘No way. Why don’t you run the marathon with me?’ So I only trained a month. My knees hurt for a while, but it wasn’t a problem otherwise back then.”

sam.farmer@latimes.com

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