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Two LAPD detectives survive ambush, help in search for shooter

Two Los Angeles police detectives ambushed outside the LAPD's Wilshire Division substation Tuesday morning have been treated at a hospital and released, officials said.

The officers were attacked from behind between 4 a.m. and 4:30 a.m. at the station at 4861 W. Venice Blvd. and fired at multiple times before the shooter or shooters ran off, LAPD sources told The Times. The car's windows were shattered and the two detectives are now aiding the investigation, officials said.

Police initially issued a tactical alert but have since called it off.

Multiple individuals  have been detained in a dragnet stretching from San Vicente to Washington boulevards and Rimpau to Redondo boulevards.

Roads in the area were jammed during the morning commute as four helicopters buzzed overhead.

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andrew.blankstein@latimes.com

kate.mather@latimes.com

joseph.serna@latimes.com

Twitter: @anblanx

Twitter: @katemather

Twitter: @josephserna

Copyright © 2015, Los Angeles Times
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