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  • Nunes’ freelancing threatens an investigation into Russian meddling

    Nunes’ freelancing threatens an investigation into Russian meddling

    Can this investigation be saved? That’s a fair question to be asked about the House Intelligence Committee’s probe of foreign meddling in last year’s election after an extraordinary violation of protocol by its chairman, Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Tulare). Nunes went public Wednesday with sensational...

  • Arkansas is turning its death penalty into an assembly line

    Arkansas is turning its death penalty into an assembly line

    The director of Arkansas’ corrections department appeared at a Little Rock Rotary Club meeting Tuesday with an unusual appeal. The state needs volunteers — as many as 48 by mid-April — and the qualifications are simple. “You seem to be a group that does not have felony backgrounds and are over...

  • California's bad boycott law makes UCLA's Bruins jump through needless hoops

    California's bad boycott law makes UCLA's Bruins jump through needless hoops

    Under a law passed last year, California prohibits state-funded travel to states that discriminate against the LGBT community. There are currently four states on the boycott list — and now South Dakota may be added. That’s because the Mount Rushmore State recently passed a law that allows taxpayer-funded...

  • Is the Trump-Russia story an octopus or spaghetti?

    Is the Trump-Russia story an octopus or spaghetti?

    How do you tell a plausible charge from a fevered fantasy? As allegations drip, drip about President Trump’s purported ties with Russia, most news consumers will want to keep an open mind about potential wrongdoing. But they won’t want to get lost in some eternal connect-the-dots game that never...

  • His family's internment earned apologies from a human rights commission. Will the U.S. government respond?

    His family's internment earned apologies from a human rights commission. Will the U.S. government respond?

    It is a shocking episode from World War II that the U.S. government refuses to take responsibility for. But this week, Art Shibayama finally got to make his case for a just ending to the tragedy that haunts him more than seven decades later. Shibayama was 13 when he was wrenched from his home in...

  • Just like her mother, Chelsea Clinton never gets a break

    Just like her mother, Chelsea Clinton never gets a break

    This week, Variety magazine announced that it would honor former first daughter Chelsea Clinton at its Women in Power luncheon with a “Lifetime achievement award.” The news spread quickly among both Trump supporters and left-leaning Clinton detractors who believe that the family’s tone-deafness...

  • Don't reopen Aliso Canyon until we know what caused the worst methane leak in history

    Don't reopen Aliso Canyon until we know what caused the worst methane leak in history

    In the wake of the Aliso Canyon methane leak — the largest such leak in U.S. history, which temporarily displaced 8,000 families from their homes — what’s wrong with using some common-sense caution before reopening the natural gas storage facility? Sen. Henry Stern (D-Canoga Park) has proposed...

  • How many high-paying out-of-state students is enough for UC?

    How many high-paying out-of-state students is enough for UC?

    Here’s one big reason for admitting out-of-state students to the undergraduate ranks of the University of California: money. Those students pay close to $30,000 more for their education each year than the locals do. Among other things, that helps pay for students from California who can’t afford...

  • The California bar exam flunks too many law school graduates

    The California bar exam flunks too many law school graduates

    I still remember opening the envelope with my California bar exam results. It’s one of those flashbulb memories. I passed, with more relief than joy. Much has changed since then. Graduates no longer open envelopes; they check scores on a computer. I was a professor then, and now I am the dean....

  • If sheriff's deputies are involved in misconduct, prosecutors have to know

    If sheriff's deputies are involved in misconduct, prosecutors have to know

    There are about 300 Los Angeles County deputy sheriffs and higher-ranking officials whose personnel files include evidence that they lied, took bribes, used excessive force or committed some other type of misconduct that is sufficiently serious to undermine their credibility as prosecution witnesses...

  • The other Japanese internment America still hasn't fully acknowledged

    The other Japanese internment America still hasn't fully acknowledged

    In March 1944, 13-year-old Isamu Carlos Arturo Shibayama, his parents and five siblings were taken from their home in Peru and shipped to New Orleans on an American troop ship. Stripped of their identity papers, the Shibayamas were admitted to the United States as “illegal aliens” and sent to a...

  • The Republican case for breaking up the notoriously liberal 9th Circuit makes no sense

    The Republican case for breaking up the notoriously liberal 9th Circuit makes no sense

    The 9th Circuit — the largest and most important of the 13 federal court circuits in the country, encompassing 11 Western states and territories and covering nearly 20% of the U.S. population — is under siege. Four Republican congressmen have introduced bills to break up the circuit in various...

  • The fight over voting rules didn't start with Trump's tweets

    The fight over voting rules didn't start with Trump's tweets

    When President Trump said “millions” voted illegally in November, he joined an old American battle. The fight over who can vote in the United States goes back more than two centuries, with one group after another demanding to participate in our democracy, and the Supreme Court often playing referee....

  • Ask Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch the hard questions. It matters

    Ask Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch the hard questions. It matters

    On Monday, the Senate Judiciary Committee will begin confirmation hearings for Judge Neil Gorsuch, President Trump’s nominee for the Supreme Court seat that has been vacant since the death more than a year ago of Justice Antonin Scalia. The cynical conventional wisdom is that Republicans will lob...

  • Alaska's national refuges are not private game reserves

    Alaska's national refuges are not private game reserves

    The 16 national wildlife refuges in Alaska span the state from the remote Arctic on the northern edge to the volcanic Aleutian islands southwest of Anchorage. Across the refuges’ nearly 77 million acres, animal diversity abounds — ice worms and seabirds, black bears and grizzly bears, wolves, moose,...

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