Readers' Representative

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For the record

Serial killings: In the April 15 LATExtra section, an article about an Orange County serial killing case said that John Gardner, who raped and killed two girls near San Diego, was monitored by GPS. Gardner was not being monitored by GPS at the time the girls were killed.

Outkast: In the April 10 Calendar section, an article about Atlanta hip-hop duo Outkast misidentified the album on which the song "Synthesizer" appeared. It was "Aquemini," not "ATLiens."

"Antboy" actors: In the April 16 Calendar section, a photo caption with a review of the movie "Antboy" misspelled actor Oscar Dietz's last name as Ditz. The caption also misidentified the actress in the photo as Amalie Kruse Jensen; she is Cecilie Alstrup Tarp.

For the record

UCLA basketball photo: In the April 17 Sports section, the caption for a photograph on an article about UCLA basketball players leaving for the NBA identified the player sitting between teammates Kyle Anderson and Zach LaVine as Norman Powell. The player in the middle was Jordan Adams.

L.A. Register: An article in the April 17 Business section about the debut of the Los Angeles Register said that its parent company, Freedom Communications Inc., is based in Irvine. Freedom is based in Santa Ana.

Subway station: An article in the April 14 LATExtra section about the Los Angeles Metropolitan Transportation Authority's Downtown Regional Connector project said that the lone entrance to a subway station at 2nd Street and Broadway would face east. The entrance will face west.

For the record

Subway station plan: In the April 16 LATExtra section, an article about a second entrance to a proposed downtown L.A. subway station included a headline that said that Tribune Co., which owns property at the site, had scuttled the subway entrance plan. As the story indicated, Metro officials made the decision to shelve the plan.

Jail activist: An article in the April 14 Section A about jail activist Patrisse Cullors included a reference that misspelled her first name as Patrice.

Pacquiao victory: A column in the April 13 Sports section about boxer Manny Pacquiao's win over Timothy Bradley said that Pacquiao entered the ring to the song "The Eye of the Tiger." In fact, it was Katy Perry's song "Roar."

If you believe that we have made an error, or you have questions about The Times' journalistic standards and practices, you may contact Deirdre Edgar, readers' representative, by email at readers.representative

@latimes.com, by phone at (877) 554-4000, by fax at (213) 237-3535 or by mail at 202 W. 1st St., Los Angeles, CA 90012. The readers' representative office is online at latimes.com/ readersrep.

For the record

Jewish center shootings: An article in the April 14 Section A about three killings at two Jewish facilities in Overland Park, Kan., said that the shootings evoked memories of a similar incident at a Jewish community center in Granada Hills in 2001. That shooting was in 1999.

For the record

The Broad Stage: An April 13 article in the Arts & Books section about the puppets in "A Midsummer Night's Dream" at the Broad Stage in Santa Monica said the production will close Wednesday. It will close Saturday.

If you believe that we have made an error, or you have questions about The Times' journalistic standards and practices, you may contact Deirdre Edgar, readers' representative, by email at readers.representative

@latimes.com, by phone at (877) 554-4000, by fax at (213) 237-3535 or by mail at 202 W. 1st St., Los Angeles, CA 90012. The readers' representative office is online at latimes.com/ readersrep.

For the record

Prisons ruling: In the April 11 LATExtra section, an article about a federal court ruling regarding the use of pepper spray against mentally ill prisoners quoted U.S. District Judge Lawrence K. Karlton as calling the practice a "horrific violation." Karlton, in his ruling, called a series of videos showing prison guards dousing inmates with pepper spray "horrific" and said that they illustrated a violation of the inmates' constitutional rights.

L.A. River cleanup: An article in the April 6 California section about a cleanup project along the Los Angeles River said that volunteer Andrea Iniguez attends Boyle Heights High School. She attends Roosevelt High School in Boyle Heights.

NHL referee: An NHL column in the April 8 Sports section said that referee Dan Van Massenhoven had worked his final game the previous week. The referee's name is Don Van Massenhoven, not Dan.

Santa Anita Derby: In the April 6 Sports section, a column said that the horse Not For Love was the mother of Santa Anita Derby winner California Chrome. In fact, Not For Love is the sire of Love the Chase, California Chrome's dam.

For the record

Mariska Hargitay: The TV Highlights listings in the April 9 Calendar section misspelled the name of actress Mariska Hargitay as Marisk Hagerty.

For the record

Mitch Eby: An article in the April 1 Sports section about Chapman University football player Mitch Eby's announcement that he is gay referred to Chapman as "a small private Christian college in Orange County." Chapman was founded by the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), but since 1991 it has been an independent university that imposes no religious requirements. It has about 7,500 undergraduate and graduate students, making it among the 10 largest private universities in the state.

Peter Matthiessen: In the April 7 LATExtra section, the obituary of Peter Matthiessen, author of "The Snow Leopard," said that he died at a hospital near his home in Sagaponack, N.Y. He died at home.

Salamunovich services: An item in the Quick Takes column of the April 9 Calendar section said that services for former Los Angeles Master Chorale music director Paul Salamunovich would be Friday for the rosary and Saturday for the funeral Mass. The rosary is Friday, May 2, and the funeral Mass is Saturday, May 3.

Website security: An article in the April 9 Business section about the "Heartbleed Bug" contained a quote offering advice to consumers that was attributed to Andrew Storms, director of DevOps at CloudPassage. It was Chris Eng, vice president of research at the application security testing firm Veracode, not Storms, who said: "Avoid things like online banking and avoid sensitive sites if you're not sure."

For the record

NSA wiretaps: An article in the April 7 Section A about a Colorado man challenging the law that allows warrantless foreign surveillance said that overseas wiretaps for foreign intelligence do not require a court order. They do require an individualized court order if the person targeted is an American. Also, the headline incorrectly identified the challenge as a lawsuit. Defendant Jamshid Muhtorov is challenging the surveillance as part of a defense motion to suppress evidence in a criminal case.

Mickey Rooney obituary: A caption that accompanied the obituary of actor Mickey Rooney in the April 7 Section A said that Rooney and Judy Garland were shown in a scene from the film "Girl Crazy." The scene was from "Babes in Arms." In addition, a caption in the same obituary misidentified actress Elaine Devry as Ava Gardner.

Flight 370: An article in the April 7 Section A about the detection of "pings" that could be from missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 said a Chinese patrol ship had picked up 37.5 MHz pulses, the same frequency emitted by a flight data recorder. The pulses were 37.5 KHz.

"Last Remaining Seats": An article in the April 5 Saturday section about the Los Angeles Conservancy benefit film series said the series kicks off June 18 with "The Lady Eve." That film leads off the series June 11.

Jeremiah Denton: An obituary in the March 29 LATExtra section for Jeremiah Denton said the Vietnam War hero had received the Distinguished Service Cross. His honors included the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Navy Cross.

Violin recital: A review in the April 6 Calendar section of a recital by violinist Pinchas Zukerman with pianist Yefim Bronfman at Walt Disney Concert Hall on Friday misspelled Zukerman's name as Zuckerman.

If you believe that we have made an error, or you have questions about The Times' journalistic standards and practices, you may contact Deirdre Edgar, readers' representative, by email at readers.representative

@latimes.com, by phone at (877) 554-4000, by fax at (213) 237-3535 or by mail at 202 W. 1st St., Los Angeles, CA 90012. The readers' representative office is online at latimes.com/ readersrep.

For the record

Despicable Me' ride: An article in the April 6 Calendar section about the Despicable Me Minion Mayhem ride incorrectly indicated that the attraction would open Thursday. It opens Saturday. The story also described the ride as not being part of Universal Studios' $1.6-billion, 25-year expansion plan. The ride is part of that plan.

For the record

Prisoner's release: An article in the March 25 LATExtra section about the release of prisoner Mary Jones said her previous convictions were dismissed after she pleaded no contest to involuntary manslaughter. She pleaded no contest to voluntary manslaughter. The error was repeated in the April 3 LATExtra section.

Ft. Hood shooter: An article in the April 4 Section A about the gunman in the April 2 shooting at Ft. Hood said Army Spec. Ivan Lopez was upset last fall when Ft. Hood officials granted him less than two days to attend his mother's funeral. At the time, Lopez was stationed at Ft. Bliss, not Ft. Hood.

Dodgers championships: An article in the April 4 Sports section about renovations to Dodger Stadium reported that the franchise had won three World Series titles in Brooklyn and three in Los Angeles. The Dodgers won one World Series championship in Brooklyn and five since their move to L.A.

Everly Brothers photo: In the April 4 Calendar section, an article in which singer Don Everly discussed the death of his brother Phil was accompanied by a photo caption that misidentified the brothers. In that photo, Phil Everly is on the left, and Don on the right.

If you believe that we have made an error, or you have questions about The Times' journalistic standards and practices, you may contact Deirdre Edgar, readers' representative, by email at readers.representative

@latimes.com, by phone at (877) 554-4000, by fax at (213) 237-3535 or by mail at 202 W. 1st St., Los Angeles, CA 90012. The readers' representative office is online at latimes.com/ readersrep.

For the record

Kings hockey: A caption with a photograph of a Los Angeles Kings player on the cover of the April 3 Sports section misidentified Robyn Regehr as Justin Williams.

Metal plant emissions: An article in the April 2 LATExtra section about emissions from a Newport Beach plant misspelled the last name of the president of Hixson Metal Finishing. His name is Douglas Greene, not Green.

Glenn Bray: An article in the March 30 Arts & Books section about comic-book collector Glenn Bray misspelled the last name of former New Yorker cartoonist Charles Addams as Adams.

If you believe that we have made an error, or you have questions about The Times' journalistic standards and practices, you may contact Deirdre Edgar, readers' representative, by email at readers.representative

@latimes.com, by phone at (877) 554-4000, by fax at (213) 237-3535 or by mail at 202 W. 1st St., Los Angeles, CA 90012. The readers' representative office is online at latimes.com/ readersrep.

For the record

Charles Keating: An obituary in the April 2 Section A of Charles Keating, the former operator of Lincoln Savings & Loan, misidentified his deceased daughter, Maureen Mulhern, as Maureen Hubbard.

New trash law: An article in the April 2 LATExtra about a new trash collection franchise system adopted by the Los Angeles City Council identified Jackie Cornejo as a project manager with the Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy. She is a project director.

If you believe that we have made an error, or you have questions about The Times' journalistic standards and practices, you may contact Deirdre Edgar, readers' representative, by email at readers.representative

@latimes.com, by phone at (877) 554-4000, by fax at (213) 237-3535 or by mail at 202 W. 1st St., Los Angeles, CA 90012. The readers' representative office is online at latimes.com/ readersrep.

For the record

Jeremiah Denton: A news obituary of Vietnam War hero Jeremiah Denton in the March 29 LATExtra section said Viet Cong soldiers captured him when his plane was shot down and later paraded him before TV cameras in a propaganda ploy that backfired. Denton was captured and imprisoned by North Vietnamese forces, not the Viet Cong.

Washington landslide: An article in the March 29 LATExtra section about the reaction of Oso, Wash., to the March 22 landslide referred to a coffee shop, with a sign saying "Oso Strong" and a barista named Katie Anderson, as Your Daily Grind. The coffee shop is called Moe's Espresso.

For the record

Landslide: An article in the March 30 Section A about the Washington state landslide said searchers found the body of Christina Jefferds on Thursday. Her remains were found Monday; her granddaughter's remains were found Thursday.

Long-term care: A column in the March 25 Business section about premium increases in long-term care policies said John Hancock Life & Health Insurance Co. raised a Laguna Woods couple's premium 90%. Though the couple live in California, the policy was purchased in New York and thus falls under New York regulations. The California insurance commissioner has approved an average 38% increase for John Hancock long-term care policies.

For the record

Cyclone Racer: An article in the March 25 Section A about a man's hope of rebuilding the Cyclone Racer roller coaster in Long Beach said that Larry Osterhoudt pulled the ride's patents at the library. According to Osterhoudt, he pulled patents for technology that predated the roller coaster, but that was later adapted and used to build the Cyclone Racer.

If you believe that we have made an error, or you have questions about The Times' journalistic standards and practices, you may contact Deirdre Edgar, readers' representative, by email at readers.representative

@latimes.com, by phone at (877) 554-4000, by fax at (213) 237-3535 or by mail at 202 W. 1st St., Los Angeles, CA 90012. The readers' representative office is online at latimes.com/ readersrep.

For the record

Imperial Valley water: An article in the March 17 Section A about water rights in the Imperial Valley referred to a local farmer and poet as "the late" Rick Mealey. Mealey, in his late 70s, is alive and living in the area. The error also appeared in a Nov. 27, 2012, article about the All-American Canal in the valley.

For the record

Armstrong books: A book review of "Cycle of Lies" in the March 23 Arts & Books section said author Juliet Macur had dismissed early accusations against cyclist Lance Armstrong as a "distraction." Macur says it was an Armstrong team staffer who characterized the allegations as a distraction, a detail she included in a 2005 article.

Catalina Island Museum: In the March 23 California section, an article about a new Catalina Island Museum in the harbor community of Avalon misspelled the last name of the facility's executive director, Michael De Marsche, as De Marshe.

California Republicans: An article in the March 23 California section about the GOP strategy for winning legislative elections this year said no Republican has held statewide office in California since 2006. It should have said no Republican has been elected to statewide office since 2006.

For the record

"Every Day Is for the Thief": A review of the book "Every Day Is for the Thief" by Teju Cole in the March 23 Arts & Books section said the capital of Nigeria is Lagos. Lagos is Nigeria's cultural capital; the actual capital is Abuja.

Chinese consumers: An article in the March 22 Business section about how Southern California malls attract shoppers from China failed to make clear that Charlie Gu, depicted assisting a Chinese tour group at the Beverly Center, is employed by the consulting firm China Luxury Advisors, not by the Beverly Center.

For the record

Appraisal tips: In the March 16 Business section, a Housing Scene column about how to get the best appraisal for your house identified John Brenan as director of appraisal issues at the Appraisal Institute. Brenan is director of appraisal issues at the Appraisal Foundation. The column also said that the Appraisal Institute was created by Congress to set appraisal standards and appraiser qualifications. That description applies to the Appraisal Foundation. The Appraisal Institute is a professional organization based in Chicago.

Park restoration: In the March 16 California section, an article about Ken Malloy Harbor Regional Park included a photo caption that said student volunteer Daria Clark, 17, was from Rancho Paloma. Daria is a resident of Rancho Palos Verdes.

Caltech astronomer: In the March 21 Section A, an article about Caltech astronomer Mike Brown said that Brown, as a student, looked through the telescope at Lick Observatory when it was focused on the middle star of Orion's belt and saw one of the universe's most spectacular nebulae. The Orion Nebula is located near the middle of Orion's sword.

IRS scam: In the March 22 Business section, an article about scammers posing as IRS agents misquoted privacy expert Alessandro Acquisti as saying Social Security numbers were first used in the 1940s. He said they were first used in the 1930s.

For the record

Toyota settlement: An article in the March 21 Business section about a federal judge's ratification of a landmark settlement by Toyota Motor Corp. over safety defects attributed the following quote to U.S. Atty. Gen. Eric Holder: "The rules of evidence sometimes do not allow you to use certain kinds of evidence and certain documents against individuals, although they might be admissible against the company itself. Although there is an admission that there were individuals who engaged in conduct which provides for a basis to bring a case against the company, they are not charged here." The quote actually was from Preet Bharara, the U.S. attorney for the southern district of New York.

Head Start: An article in the March 19 LATExtra section about the possible closure of Kedren Head-Start early-preschool centers in Los Angeles County said that Kedren had served 727 children in Watts and that 775 of Kedren's slots could be reallocated to the Children's Institute Inc., which the story referred to as a reduced number. The 775 slots would be divided among six areas, including Watts.

Medal of Honor recipients: An article in the March 19 Section A about President Obama bestowing the Medal of Honor on 24 veterans included a caption that identified Melvin Morris as a retired Army staff sergeant. Morris, who was honored at the White House ceremony for his heroic actions as a staff sergeant in 1969, is a retired Army sergeant first class.

If you believe that we have made an error, or you have questions about The Times' journalistic standards and practices, you may contact Deirdre Edgar, readers' representative, by email at readers.representative

@latimes.com, by phone at (877) 554-4000, by fax at (213) 237-3535 or by mail at 202 W. 1st St., Los Angeles, CA 90012. The readers' representative office is online at latimes.com/ readersrep.

For the record

NCAA basketball: An article on the evolution of the term "March Madness," now used to describe the NCAA basketball tournament, in the March 20 Section A said that the term was first printed by Henry V. Porter, relating to the Illinois high school basketball tournament, in 1939. Although Porter is widely credited, word historians have found earlier references regarding March Madness being used to describe the annual high school basketball tournament in Indiana.

For the record

"Noah": In the March 13 Calendar section, an article about the film "Noah" said that the National Religious Broadcasters threatened to boycott the film unless Paramount Pictures added a disclaimer to the film's marketing materials. The NRB says it did not threaten a boycott.

Uma Thurman film: In the March 19 Calendar section, an article about actress Uma Thurman said that the opening day of the film "Nymphomaniac: Vol 2" would be April 18. The film is opening April 4.

For the record

Earthquake wake-up call: An article in the March 18 Section A about a 4.4 earthquake in Encino included a map that contained two errors regarding recent earthquakes in the Los Angeles region. A Pasadena earthquake that struck in 1988 had a magnitude of 5.0, not 4.4, and the location of a 5.9 quake near Alhambra was about three miles to the east of the site shown on the map.

Congressional candidates: In the March 18 LATExtra section, an article about Democratic California House members who face tough reelection campaigns gave the first name of Republican Elizabeth Emken, who is challenging Rep. Ami Bera, as Susan.

For the record

Triple murder case: In the March 13 LATExtra section, a brief news item about two men being charged in a Riverside County triple murder case said that Robert Lars Pape had pleaded not guilty to all charges and that Cristin Conrad Smith did not enter a plea. It was Smith who pleaded not guilty and Pape who did not enter a plea and had his hearing pushed back.

Getty finances: In the March 13 Calendar section, an article about the J. Paul Getty Trust's finances overstated the 2013 compensation of several Getty officials. The correct totals are $1,630,956 for chief investment officer James Williams, $1,077,293 for Getty president James Cuno, $766,826 for museum director Timothy Potts, $716,185 for chief financial officer Patricia Woodworth, $645,780 for conservation institute director Thomas Gaehtgens, $528,447 for grants program director Deborah Marrow and $507,708 for conservation institute director Tim Whelan.

Ennio Morricone: A classical music listing in the March 16 Arts & Books section said that film composer Ennio Morricone would lead an ensemble of musicians and singers in concert at Nokia Theatre on Thursday. That concert has been postponed until June 15 because Morricone has sustained a back injury.

College athletics: In the March 9 Sports section, an item in the Day in Sports roundup said that UCLA Associate Athletic Director Mark Harlan had accepted the athletic director job at San Francisco. The job is at the University of South Florida.

Horse racing: In the March 9 Sports section, an article about the Santa Anita Handicap said that third-place finisher Blingo paid $22.80. Blingo paid $5.40.

Sheila MacRae obituary: In the March 9 California section, the obituary of actress Sheila MacRae, who played Alice Kramden in the late-1960s TV revival of "The Honeymooners," said that Audrey Meadows originated the role. Actress Pert Kelton was the first to play Alice opposite Jackie Gleason's Ralph.

Native Diver: In the March 9 California section, an article about the excavation of the remains of a race horse named Native Diver referred to a photograph signed by Cary Grant of the horse crossing the finish line in his 1961 Hollywood Gold Cup win. Native Diver won the Gold Cup in 1965, 1966 and 1967. The photograph was from his 1965 win.

For the record

"Le Week-End": In the March 13 Calendar section, a headline on an article about the making of the film "Le Week-End" misspelled the last name of Jean-Luc Godard as Goddard.

For the record

Native Diver: An article in the March 9 California section about the excavation of the remains of a race horse named Native Diver referred to a photograph signed by Cary Grant of the horse crossing the finish line in his 1961 Hollywood Gold Cup win. Native Diver won the Gold Cup in 1965, 1966 and 1967. The photograph was from his 1965 win.

Tennis: An article on the BNP Paribas Open at Indian Wells in the March 12 Sports section said that Novak Djokovic defeated Alejandro Gonzalez, 6-1, 6-3, 6-1, on Tuesday. The score was 6-1, 3-6, 6-1.

For the record

Particle Fever" review: A review of the documentary film "Particle Fever" in the March 7 Calendar section said that the Large Hadron Collider was constructed near Lucerne, Switzerland. The location is near Geneva.

Downtown Las Vegas: An article in the Feb. 28 Section A about redevelopment of Las Vegas' downtown by Zappos.com founder Tony Hsieh said tha longtime resident Lou Filardo was 68. He is 69.

For the record

New York terrorism trial: An article in Section A on March 10 about the terrorism trial of Sulaiman abu Ghaith said witness Sahim Alwan testified that Abu Ghaith had urged others to pledge loyalty to Osama bin Laden. Alwan testified that he had heard Abu Ghaith discuss the idea of pledging loyalty to Bin Laden.

Sheila MacRae: An obituary in the March 9 California section of actress Sheila MacRae, who played Alice Kramden in the late-1960s TV revival of "The Honeymooners," said Audrey Meadows originated the role. Actress Pert Kelton was the first to play Alice opposite Jackie Gleason's Ralph.

College athletics: An item in the Day in Sports roundup in the March 9 Sports section said UCLA Associate Athletic Director Mark Harlan had accepted the athletic director job at San Francisco. The correct school is South Florida.

For the record

Horse racing: An article in the March 9 Sports section on the Santa Anita Handicap said third-place finisher Blingo paid $22.80. Blingo paid $5.40.

For the record

Oregon and gay marriage: In the March 2 Section A, an article about the debate over same-sex marriage in Oregon gave Portland Archbishop Alexander K. Sample's first name as Andrew.

Anthony Bay profile: In the March 2 Business section, a How I Made It profile of Rdio Chief Executive Anthony Bay said that he received his bachelor's degree in economics from USC. The degree is from UCLA.

Data security: The Housing Scene column in the March 2 Business section about how to ensure that personal mortgage information is safe from hackers said that Brian Koss is president of Mortgage Network. Koss is executive vice president.

Eliot Ness: In the March 2 Section A, an article about the controversy over naming the new Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives headquarters after Prohibition-era law enforcement agent Eliot Ness misstated Ness' job title after leaving Washington. He was not Cincinnati's public safety director, but a senior investigator.

Echo Park's NO: In the March 8 Calendar section, a profile of the Echo Park band NO said that its record label, Arts & Crafts Records, is based in Montreal. It is based in Toronto.

For the record

Bel-Air residence: In the March 6 LATExtra section, an article about a dispute over the height of a proposed home in Bel-Air said that the residence would be roughly 20,000 square feet, based on an estimate from the developer. That estimate, the developer says, did not include a basement and garage. Planning documents say the total project is roughly 40,000 square feet.

Don Murray: An article in the March 7 Calendar section about a UCLA film event honoring actor Don Murray gave the actor's age as 83. He is 84.

For the record

AeroVironment earnings: An article in the March 5 Business section about Monrovia drone maker AeroVironment Inc.'s third-quarter earnings said that the company had previously experienced four consecutive quarterly losses. It experienced four straight quarters with revenue declines.

Oscar winners: In a photo spread of Oscar winners in the March 4 Calendar section, the caption for a photo of supporting actor winner Jared Leto misidentified Leonardo DiCaprio's mother, Irmelin Indenbirken, as actress Laura Dern.

Chicagoland: A review in the March 6 Calendar section of CNN's new series "Chicagoland" said that now-U.S. Sen. Cory Booker was a former mayor of Jersey City, N.J. He was the mayor of Newark.

Elaine Stritch: An article in the March 6 Calendar section about the documentary "Elaine Stritch: Shoot Me" said that the movie was filmed in 201 and 2012. It should have said 2011 and 2012.

Oscars pizza: An article in the March 4 Business section about Ellen DeGeneres' pizza-ordering stunt during the broadcast of the Academy Awards said that the Big Mama's & Papa's chain sells a 54-square-inch pizza. That pizza is 54 inches on each side, or 2,916 square inches.

For the record

"Bliss" comic: The "Bliss" comic in the March 4 Calendar section was missing its caption. It should have said, "And over here is my Xbox nook."

Eliot Ness: An article in the March 2 Section A about the controversy over naming the new Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives headquarters after Prohibition-era law enforcement agent Eliot Ness misstated Ness' job title after leaving Washington. He was not Cincinnati's public safety director, but a senior investigator.

Rachel and Terence Winter: The Sunday Conversation in the March 2 Calendar section said that film producers Rachel and Terence Winter were the only married couple ever to secure Oscar nominations for different films in the same year. In fact, Rex Harrison and Rachel Roberts were nominated in 1964 (for 1963 movies) for lead actor ("Cleopatra") and actress ("This Sporting Life").

Crimean crisis: A photo caption with an article in the March 4 Section A about a standoff between Russian and Ukrainian troops misidentified the location where Russian President Vladimir Putin was watching military exercises. Putin was in the region of Leningrad, not the city, which is now known as St. Petersburg.

For the record

"Non-Stop": A review of "Non-Stop" in the Feb. 28 Calendar section said the movie opens with air marshal Bill Marks (played by Liam Neeson) waiting for a flight to Amsterdam. He is waiting for a flight to London.

Data security: The Housing Scene column in the March 2 Business section on how to ensure that personal mortgage information is safe from hackers said Brian Koss was president of Mortgage Network. Koss is executive vice president.

For the record

Oregon gay marriage: An article in the March 2 Section A about the debate over same-sex marriage in Oregon gave an incorrect first name for the archbishop of Portland. He is Archbishop Alexander K. Sample, not Andrew.

Anthony Bay profile: In the March 2 Business section, a How I Made It profile of Rdio Chief Executive Anthony Bay said he received his bachelor's degree in economics from USC. Bay received the degree from UCLA.

For the record

Academic Decathlon: An article in the Feb. 23 California section about John Marshall High School's victory in the Los Angeles Unified School District's Academic Decathlon said that the school won its first national title in 1995. Marshall won the national title in 1987 and 1995.

Drug lord's arrest: An article in the Feb. 23 Section A about the arrest of Sinaloa drug cartel chief Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman included a photo caption that said Guzman was arrested at a 10-story condo complex. As the article correctly said, it was an 11-story complex.

For the record

The Middle Ages: In the Saturday section elsewhere in this edition, a Chris Erskine column about remodeling his daughter's closet refers to another dad as Glickman. His last name is Lichtman. The error was discovered after the section went to press.

Human rights abuses: In the Feb. 28 Section A, the byline of an article about rights abuses worldwide in 2013 gave reporter Daniel Rothberg's last name as Rothman.

Jim Lange: On the Feb. 28 LATExtra cover, the photo with an index item about the death of "Dating Game" host Jim Lange was from an episode of "Laverne & Shirley" in which characters appeared on the game show. It was not from an episode of the "Dating Game."

Ronan Farrow: In a Feb. 25 Calendar section article comparing MSNBC's Ronan Farrow and CNN's Piers Morgan, the difference in their ages was given as "more than three decades." As the article stated elsewhere, Farrow is 26 and Morgan is 48.

Capitol Journal: A column in the Feb. 27 Section A about state Sen. Ron Calderon's fitness for public office said that state Sen. Roderick Wright lived in a Baldwin Park house outside of his district. The house is in Baldwin Hills.

For the record

Calderon investigation: An article in the June 6 Section A about an FBI investigation into Sen. Ron Calderon (D-Montebello) said that the senator's brother, former Assemblyman Tom Calderon, received $140,000 per year from the company Water2Save, which was chosen for a project by the Central Basin Municipal Water District. Tom Calderon's $140,000-per-year contract was with Central Basin. He had a separate consulting contract with Water2Save.

Employment Development Department: An article in the Feb. 26 Business section about the large number of EDD appeals misidentified state Assemblyman Henry T. Perea (D-Fresno) as a state senator.

For the record

Academic Decathlon: An article in the Feb. 23 California section about John Marshall High School's victory in the Los Angeles Unified School District's Academic Decathlon said the school won its first national title in 1995. Marshall won the national title in 1987 and 1995.

For the record

Leimert Park Village: An article in the Feb. 10 Section A about a possible revitalization of Leimert Park Village with the addition of a planned light rail station said the neighborhood's Vision Theater had been closed for years. The theater is available to rent for special events.

Shirley Temple Black: A photo caption with the news obituary of Shirley Temple Black misidentified her "Heidi" costar as Adolph Kramer. Adolph Kramer was the movie character's name. He was played by actor Jean Hersholt.

Westminster Kennel Club: An article in the Feb. 9 Section A about dogs entered in the Westminster Kennel Club's agility competition said that ABBA, a border collie, went home without a prize. ABBA won a prize in the Best in Class competition at the dog show.

For the record

New Orleans recovery: In the Jan. 19 Section A, an article about the recovery of the Lower 9th Ward in New Orleans said that the nonprofit group Make It Right had built 100 homes and planned to erect an additional 150. The group plans to build a total of 150 homes, 100 of which have been built.

Mideast allies: In the Jan. 25 Section A, an article about U.S. allies' concerns that the Obama administration is scaling back its role in the Middle East said that Iran agreed Jan. 20 to a six-month interim deal that calls for a partial lifting of sanctions in exchange for a partial freeze on its nuclear enrichment work. Iran agreed to a deal in November, and it took effect Jan. 20.

Homicide Report: In the Jan. 19 Section A, an article about the neighborhood with Los Angeles County's highest homicide rate gave the wrong age for Jacky Pineda, whose fiance was killed in December. She is 27, not 22.

Sheriff's candidate: An article in the Jan. 23 LATExtra section about who might be appointed to replace resigning Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca on an interim basis misspelled the last name of a candidate for sheriff in the election later this year. The candidate is Assistant Sheriff Jim Hellmold, not Hellmond.

9/11 museum: In the Jan. 25 Section A, an article about the 9/11 Memorial Museum in New York said that Charles G. Wolf is a member of the 9/11 museum board. He is not.

For the record

Richard Lester: An article in the Jan. 10 Calendar section about director Richard Lester said his hometown is Pittsburgh. Lester was born in Philadelphia.

"True Detective": A review of the HBO series "True Detective" in the Jan. 10 Calendar section said character Martin Hart, played by Woody Harrelson, was "a hallucinating insomniac." The description was of character Rust Cohle, played by Matthew McConaughey.

GED test: An article in the Jan. 6 LATExtra section about a new online-only General Educational Development exam said the test has five sections. The new exam has four sections.

Air Force investigation: In the Jan. 10 Section A, an article about the Air Force's investigation of two officers for possible involvement in illegal drugs misspelled Kirtland Air Force Base as Kirkland.

Pac-12 basketball: An article in the Jan. 10 Sports section about California's 96-83 victory over Oregon in men's basketball misspelled Cal guard Jordan Mathews name as Matthews.

Prison population: The online version of a Jan. 10 LATExtra section article on a projected increase in California's state prison population was originally accompanied by an undated photo of California State Prison in Lancaster that showed inmates housed in triple bunk beds. That level of crowding no longer exists, and the last triple bunks were removed in March 2012. In addition, the caption erred in listing the location as Los Angeles.

For the record

405 Freeway closure: In the Aug. 11 California section, an article about this weekend's 405 Freeway closure in Orange County said that it would not be a full freeway closure for northbound traffic. In fact, although northbound motorists will have a simpler detour than southbound motorists, all lanes of the northbound 405 freeway will be closed at Valley View Street.

For the record

Breast cancer: In the July 24 LATExtra section, an article about racial disparities among breast cancer patients said that the primary reason black women fared worse than white women was that they had more chronic health problems before their cancers developed. A more important factor was the fact that cancers in black patients were more advanced by the time they were diagnosed. In addition, the article said that if black patients began treatment earlier, the survival gap between blacks and whites would grow. The survival gap would in fact fall by about two years. Also, the middle name of City of Hope Cancer Center researcher Kimlin Tam Ashing was misspelled as Tan.

A Flock of Seagulls theft: A Quick Takes item in the July 24 Calendar section about the theft of an equipment van from the British rock band A Flock of Seagulls included quotes from lead singer Mike Score without attributing their source. Score made the comments to the Daily News, which should have been credited.

Beach volleyball: Professional beach volleyball competitors Summer Ross and April Ross were identified as second cousins in an article in the July 26 Sports section. They are not related.

Virginia Johnson: The obituary of pioneering sex researcher Virginia Johnson in the July 26 LATExtra section said that she studied music at Drury University near Jefferson City, Mo. The school is in Springfield, Mo.

For the record

Los Angeles Philharmonic: A review of the Los Angeles Philharmonic in the July 25 Calendar section said that the first Hollywood Bowl shell was built by Frank Lloyd Wright. It was designed by his son, Lloyd Wright.

Jeffrey Deitch: An article in the July 25 LATExtra section about the search for a successor to Jeffrey Deitch as director of the Museum of Contemporary Art referred to Charles Young as a former UC chancellor. Young is a former UCLA chancellor.

John Casablancas obituary: The obituary of Elite modeling agency founder John Casablancas in the July 23 LATExtra section misspelled the first name of Wilhelmina Cooper, who founded Wilhelmina Models, as Wilhemina.

For the record

Jeffrey Deitch: In the July 24 Calendar section, an article listing highs and lows of Jeffrey Deitch's tenure as director of the Museum of Contemporary Art cited comments that he made during a public interview with art advisor Josh Baer "at Miami's Art Basel." The interview was at Art Basel in Switzerland. The article also said that Deitch arrived at MOCA in January 2010. MOCA announced his hiring that month, but he started in June 2010.

Igor Stravinsky: In the July 21 Arts & Books section, the caption for a photo that accompanied an article about composer Igor Stravinsky and his work "The Rite of Spring" referred to conductor Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos as a composer.

For the record

Military mansions: A Pentagon report cited in an article in the July 21 Section A about houses provided to U.S. generals and admirals misstated the termination date of two military leases in Italy. The lease for Villa de Iorio will be canceled next month, not next May. The lease for Villa Anna will be canceled this fall, not in 2014, according to Anthony Cooper, a spokesman for the Navy's Installation Command. In addition, the article implied that Rear Adm. Robert Burke, the commander of Submarine Group 8, was living in Villa de Iorio. He was living in an apartment.

Freeway tunnel repairs: In the July 20 LATExtra section, an article about possible repairs to the Los Angeles freeway tunnel that was damaged in a tanker truck crash referred to Caltrans senior bridge engineer Tony Brake as Tom.

For the record

Bag tags: In the July 14 Travel section, in the Need to Know column, an item on baggage tags that fliers can print themselves reported that Alaska Airlines offers that option. An airline representative now says the carrier has temporarily suspended the home bag-tag program to comply with new Transportation Security Administration requirements.

NFL: A photo caption accompanying an article about the AFC teams in the July 18 Sports section misspelled Denver Broncos wide receiver Wes Welker's name as Walker.

For the record

California-Pacific Triennial: A review of the 2013 California-Pacific Triennial exhibition at the Orange County Museum of Art in the July 5 Calendar section misspelled the last name of artist Hugo Crosthwaite as Crossthwaite.

CrossFit exercise: In the May 4 Saturday section, an article about a CrossFit abdominal exercise demonstrated by Cassey Ho of Blogilates said that it was inspired by Pilates. The move shown was inspired by gymnastics training.

Angel City Jazz Festival: An article in the July 18 Calendar section about the lineup for the Angel City Jazz Festival this fall said that Dafnis Prieto would be performing with his Proverb Trio. Prieto will instead perform with his sextet.

For the record

Brain scans: An article in the July 15 Section A about brain scans of prison inmates said Owen D. Jones, a Vanderbilt University professor of law and biology, had come to view the lack of empathy displayed by psychopaths as a missing skill, akin to a dyslexic's inability to read. The comment was made by neuroscientist Kent Kiehl of the Mind Research Network.

Roosevelt wheelchair: An article in the July 14 Section A about rare film footage showing President Franklin D. Roosevelt in a moving wheelchair said that President Clinton dedicated a statue in 2006 depicting Roosevelt in a wheelchair. The dedication ceremony was in 2001.

For the record

Dietary supplements: A July 7 Op-Ed article about alternative medications misstated the name of a 1994 law; it is the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Law, not the Dietary Supplement and Health Education Law. The article said that the FDA does not regulate dietary supplements. Manufacturers do not need FDA approval to bring dietary supplements to market, but the agency has established safety, labeling and manufacturing rules for supplements. The Op-Ed said only 170 supplements have documented safety tests; only 170 have submitted safety documentation to the FDA under a rule governing supplements marketed after 1994. The Op-Ed said the American Assn. of Poison Control Centers' reported 1.3 million adverse reactions to vitamins, minerals and dietary supplements between 1983 and 2004; in that period, the association reported 1.3 million exposures, which don't necessarily involve adverse reactions.

For the record

Arizona firefighters: In the July 11 LATExtra section, the photo credits were transposed on two images from Los Angeles Times photographers pertaining to the arrival in Southern California of caskets containing the bodies of two firefighters killed in Arizona. The photo showing mourners at the Joint Forces Training Base in Los Alamitos was taken by Mark Boster. The photo showing firefighters saluting at a Hemet mortuary was taken by Gina Ferazzi.

Alexander Graham Bell auction: In a July 11 Calendar section article about historic documents concerning Alexander Graham Bell's efforts to build a flying machine, one of several references to the auction company Profiles in History gave the company's name as Profiles in Heritage.

For the record

Dodgers bobblehead: In the July 11 Sports section, a column said that the Dodgers were having Adrian Gonzalez bobblehead night Friday. The event was Thursday.

For the record

Weather page: In the July 8 LATExtra section, the weather page published was for the July 1 edition and contained data and records for June 30.

Wisconsin abortion law: A brief article in the July 9 LATExtra section about a judge's temporary halt of a pending new abortion law in Wisconsin said that the law would require women to view an ultrasound of the fetus. In fact, the law would require providers to "display the ultrasound images so that the pregnant woman may view them" but would not require her to look. The article also said that the law would permit fathers and grandparents of aborted fetuses to sue doctors for emotional distress, even if they had consented to the abortion in writing. In fact, they could sue only if the provider violated the abortion law, in which case a contract would not be a defense in court.

Money Talk: The headline on a column in the July 7 Business section said that "Chapter 11 could be the only recourse" for a reader who had incurred large credit card debts. Individuals who file for protection from creditors are covered by Chapters 7 and 13 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code, not Chapter 11.

Missing pit bull: In the July 9 LATExtra section, an article about a pit bull found in Florida and returned to California said that the dog was photographed crossing the border from Florida into Mississippi. The two states do not share a border. The dog was photographed as he was being driven on one part of his journey, from Florida to Mississippi.

E-cigarettes: An article in the July 6 Saturday section about the debate over the use of electronic cigarettes omitted the first name of John "JJ" Jenkins, owner of the Vapor Spot in Westwood.

UCLA basketball: In the July 9 Sports section, the caption for a photo accompanying an article about new Bruins Coach Steve Alford misspelled the name of the former player pictured with Alford as Chris Johnson. He is Kris Johnson, also known as Kristaan.

Mission paintings: An article in the July 8 LATExtra section about the restoration of artwork at Mission San Juan Capistrano said that there were 12 paintings in the church's Stations of the Cross collection. The Stations of the Cross consist of 14 paintings.

For the record

Asiana crash: In the July 9 Section A, an article about the investigation of the crash of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 at San Francisco International Airport misspelled pilot Lee Kang-kook's name as Lee Hang-kook.

Asiana crash investigation: In the July 8 Section A, an article about the investigation of the crash of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 at San Francisco International Airport said that the pilot of the plane, Lee Kang-kook, was an experienced pilot with other types of planes, including Boeing 747s, 737s and A320s. The A320 is made by Airbus.

Asiana crash graphic: Because of an error in converting knots to miles per hour, a graphic in the July 9 Section A said that Asiana Airlines Flight 214's target landing speed was almost 162 mph. The actual targeted landing speed was about 158 mph. A corrected graphic can be found at latimes.com/landinggraphic.

Summer meal programs: An article in the July 5 LATExtra section about funding for summer meal programs in schools said that a grant from the Ford Foundation was helping Para los Ninos feed students at its two charter campuses. The grant is from the Ford Motor Co. Fund.

Joe Conley: A brief obituary of actor Joe Conley in the July 9 LATExtra section said that the name of his character on "The Waltons" was Ike Godfrey. It was Ike Godsey.

For the record

Downtown Film Festival: An article in the July 8 Calendar section about Downtown Film Festival Los Angeles said the event opens with Wayne Thompson's "Who the ... Is Arthur Fogel?," suggesting that Thompson directed the documentary. Thompson is the executive producer; the film was directed by Ron Chapman.

Micro apartments: An article in the July 4 Business section about a new complex of small apartments in Santa Monica said the building called NMS @ Lincoln is at the northwest corner of Lincoln Boulevard and Broadway. It is at the northeast corner.

For the record

Payments to bias victims: In the July 2 Section A, a headline on an article about federal officials demanding $12.5 million in payments to victims of harassment in the Antelope Valley said that federal authorities had ordered Los Angeles County, Lancaster and Palmdale to make the payments. In fact, the U.S. attorney general's office requested the payments from those government entities as part of a settlement demand.

Diane Ladd: In the June 16 Business section, an item in the Hot Property column about Diane Ladd putting her gated compound in Ojai up for sale said that the actress is 80. She is 70.

For the record

Voting rights: In the June 30 Section A, an article about the effects of the Supreme Court's decision striking down a key portion of the Voting Rights Act said Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. wrote that black voter registration in Mississippi was 6.4% in 1965, versus 7% today. It should have said that Roberts compared the 1965 rate against the 2004 rate of 76%, not 7%.

Lost luggage: In the July 1 Section A, a Monday Business article about devices that are sold to prevent airlines from losing luggage said that U.S.-based carriers lose or mishandle luggage at a rate of about 3 bags for every 100,000 passengers. The rate is about 3 for every 1,000 passengers, according to federal statistics.

Airline merger: In the June 21 Business section, an article about the proposed merger of American Airlines and US Airways said that Delta Air Lines and Continental Airlines merged in 2010. It was United Airlines that merged with Continental in 2010.

Gordon Bricken: In the June 28 LATExtra section, the obituary of former Santa Ana mayor and Civil War buff Gordon Bricken said that he had worked on noise attention projects for his acoustical engineering firm. It should have said noise attenuation projects.

For the record

Exodus International: In the June 21 Section A, an article about the closing of Exodus International, a ministry in the "gay cure" movement, mistakenly attributed a quote, "In more and more communities, churches are grappling with homosexuality in more open terms. These are the cultural realities around us." The words should have been attributed to Russell Moore, president of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, not Ross Murray, director of news and faith initiatives at gay rights group GLAAD. Also, the headline indicated that Exodus International was based in Anaheim; the group was founded in Anaheim but later moved to Florida.

Kenneth Wilson: The obituary of Nobel Prize-winning physicist Kenneth G. Wilson in the June 21 LATExtra section said that his survivors included a stepsister and two stepbrothers. They are Wilson's half sister and two half brothers, not stepsiblings.

For the record

Memorial Day photo: In the May 27 Section A, the caption for a photo that showed National Guard Sgt. Eric Hille visiting the grave of his friend Sgt. Erick Holke at Riverside National Cemetery said that Holke had been killed by an improvised explosive device while the two were on a mission together in Iraq. Hille now says that he misstated the facts. Holke died in a road accident in Iraq.

For the record

Zack Snyder: An article in the June 16 Calendar section about Zack Snyder, director of the movie "Man of Steel," said a conversation between Snyder and producer-director Christopher Nolan took place in fall 2010 on the way back from Las Vegas' CinemaCon. The conversation took place that spring. In 2010, CinemaCon was known as ShoWest; the convention did not change its name to CinemaCon until 2011.

U.S. soccer team: An article in the June 16 Sports section said the U.S. team was taking a 24-match winning streak at home in World Cup qualifying into Tuesday's game in Utah against Honduras. In fact, the U.S. entered that game with a 24-match unbeaten streak in qualifying on home soil, with a 22-0-2 record dating to 2001.

For the record

Sam Most: A news obituary of flutist Sam Most in the June 15 LATExtra section incorrectly described jazz musician Yusef Lateef as younger than Most. Lateef is older.


For the record

Production company: In the June 14 Calendar section, an article about the movie production company A24 misspelled the name of the Weinstein Co., where A24 employee Noah Sacco previously worked, as the Einstein Co.

Media deal: In the June 14 Business section, an article about media giant Gannett Co.'s acquisition of Belo Corp. referred to the Dallas Morning News as the Dallas Morning Star.

For the record

NBA Finals: In the June 11 Sports section, an article about the Miami Heat-San Antonio Spurs series said that LeBron James missed 11 of his first 13 shots in Game 2. James missed nine of his first 11 shots in that game.

Iranian soccer fans: In the June 13 LATExtra section, a photo caption that accompanied an article about Iranian immigrants who are following their homeland's World Cup quest misspelled the last name of announcer Behrooz Afrakhan as Afrakahn.

Surf Air: In the June 13 Business section, an article about Surf Air, a Santa Monica-based membership airline, said that the airline flies from Burbank to San Marcos. It flies from Burbank to San Carlos, Calif.

Center Theatre Group: In the June 13 Calendar section, an article about Center Theatre Group's finances gave two different figures for the post-recession drop in average performances per season at the Mark Taper Forum. The correct figure is 21%, not 27%.

Mobile payments: In the June 13 Business section, a photo caption with an article about mobile payment systems misidentified Schodorf's Luncheonette owner Matt Schodorf as Mark.

"His Girl Friday": In the June 12 Calendar section, a review of "His Girl Friday" at La Jolla Playhouse said that Steve Rankin did the sound design. The sound designer is Mark Bennett.

For the record

Money Talk: In the June 9 Business section, the Money Talk column said that people who start Social Security benefits early can't switch to a different or higher benefit later. People who start Social Security payments based on their own record before full retirement age lock in permanently reduced benefits, but they may be able to switch to a higher spousal benefit later. People who start spousal benefits before full retirement age can't later switch to their own benefit.

Foster care contractor: In the June 12 Section A, an article about Los Angeles County supervisors cutting ties with foster care contractor Teens Happy Homes identified Fiona Gonsier as a member of the Santa Monica Disabilities Commission. Gonsier is a candidate for the commission, not a current member.

Mumford & Sons: In the June 12 Calendar section, a Quick Takes item about a member of the English neo-folk band Mumford & Sons who was hospitalized with a blood clot in his brain misspelled the band member's last name. He is Ted Dwane, not Ted Dwayne.

Student film production: In the June 12 Business section, an article about the rise in student film production in L.A. said that director Francis Ford Coppola was an alumnus of USC. Coppola is a graduate of UCLA.

"The Match Game": In the June 10 Calendar section, a graphic with the Classic Hollywood column said correctly that Gene Rayburn hosted the daytime game show "The Match Game" on NBC from 1962 to 1969. However, the accompanying photo of Rayburn showed him with Brett Somers and Charles Nelson Reilly from a revival of the show that ran on CBS from 1973 to 1979.

For the record

Dole Food Co.: In the June 10 Section A, a Monday Business stock spotlight article about Dole Food Co. said that Chief Executive David A. DeLorenzo stepped down to run Itochu Corp. He joined Itochu Corp. to run the newly acquired Dole Asia Holdings. Also, the article said Dole's profit in 2011 was $42 billion; the profit was $42 million.

Power from dairy waste: In the June 9 Business section, an article about dairy farmers exploring the use of systems that convert cow manure into energy identified Stacey Sullivan as policy director at San Francisco environmental group Conservation California. The group's name is Sustainable Conservation.

Heinrich Rohrer: In the May 24 LATExtra section, the obituary of Nobel Prize-winning physicist Heinrich Rohrer said that he and Gerd Binnig produced an image of the letters "IBM" in xenon atoms on a nickel crystal. In fact, Donald M. Eigler and Erhard Schweizer were the scientists responsible for that feat. Rohrer and Binnig patented the electron microscope used in the experiment.

Baseball draft: In the June 7 Sports section, a photo caption said that University of San Diego third baseman Kris Bryant was chosen by the Colorado Rockies in the Major League Baseball draft on Thursday. As the accompanying article correctly said, Bryant was selected by the Chicago Cubs.

For the record

Boy's death: A column in the June 8 Section A about the death of a Palmdale boy allegedly tortured and killed by his mother and her boyfriend, as the Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services was investigating allegations of abuse, incorrectly referred to the child as Gabriel Hernandez. His name was Gabriel Fernandez.

National security leaks: An article in the June 10 Section A about national security leaks incorrectly described Bradley Manning as a former Army intelligence officer. He is a former intelligence analyst who is an enlisted soldier, not an officer.

Peter Rainer: An information box accompanying an interview with film critic Peter Rainer in the June 10 Calendar section said that he would be appearing at Vroman's Book Store in Pasadena on Wednesday. Rainer's appearance at Vroman's is scheduled for June 19.

Tony women: An article in the June 10 Calendar section about women winning directing honors at the Tony Awards stated that Diane Paulus and Pam MacKinnon were the four and fifth women to win Tonys for directing. It omitted the 2008 winner for best direction of a play, Anna Shapiro for "August: Osage County," making Paulus and MacKinnon the fifth and sixth female Tony-winning directors.

Tony Awards: An article in the June 10 Calendar section about the Tony Awards misidentified Courtney B. Vance, who won the Tony for featured actor in "Lucky Guy," as an actress.

"Louie": The Gold Standard column in the June 6 Envelope section said the Louis C.K. show "Louie" airs on HBO. The comedy appears on the FX channel.

Sunset Strip: An article in the June 9 Arts & Books section about music on the Sunset Strip misidentified Todd Steadman, executive director and chief executive of the Sunset Strip Music Festival, as Scott Steadman.

School bonds: An article in the June 3 Section A about the influence of underwriters in school bond campaigns gave an incorrect name for one of the authors of a study of California school bond measures. He is Thad Calabrese of NYU, not Chad Calabrese.

Craft museum: A review in the June 7 Calendar section of the "CFAM Granny Squared" exhibition at the Craft and Folk Art Museum misspelled the middle name of Yarn Bombing Los Angeles member Arzu Arda Kosar as Ardah.


For the record

"Candy Crush Saga": A May 26 article about the mobile game "Candy Crush Saga" stated that the game's developer, King.com, also released the game "Bejewled Blitz." That game was published by PopCap Games. Also, King.com has recently changed its name to King. And its game "Bubble Witch Saga" is not a "match three" game, as the article stated, but a "bubble shooter."

For the record

Chinese president: In the June 7 LATExtra section, an article about members of the Southern California Chinese community hoping to catch a glimpse of visiting Chinese President Xi Jinping referred to Carson Zhang's strong ties to the Chinese consulate, which were of little help in getting information about Xi's visit. It was Sue Zhang, not Carson Zhang, who found the consulate ties of little help.

Cyber attacks: In the June 6 Section A, an article regarding U.S. concerns about cyber attacks from China said that Adam Segal is an expert on China and cyber security at the nonpartisan Brookings Institution. Segal is a senior fellow at the nonpartisan Council on Foreign Relations.

Kiefer Sutherland: In the June 7 Calendar section, a Quick Takes item about Kiefer Sutherland's taking on a role in the next "Metal Gear Solid" game misspelled the last name of actor David Hayter as Hayte.

Esther Williams: In the June 7 Calendar section, an appreciation of Esther Williams said that MGM's "Ben Hur" was released in 1926. The film came out in 1925.

For the record

Brain games: In the June 1 Saturday section, an article about software programs that promise to boost mental agility gave the number of regular Lumosity users as 35,000. At the time of publication, the reported total was 35 million. However, Lumosity says its users have now topped 40 million.

"Graceland": In the June 6 Calendar section, a review of the new USA series "Graceland" said that the pilot was directed by Renny Harlin. The pilot was directed by Russell Fine.

For the record

Chrysler: An article in the June 5 Section A about Chrysler's rejection of a recall request from U.S. regulators said safety advocate Clarence Ditlow believed it would cost $1,000 per vehicle to repair alleged fuel tank problems with Chrysler's Jeep Grand Cherokee and Liberty models. In fact, Ditlow estimated it would cost $100 per vehicle to make the fix.

Child death: An article in the May 31 Section A about the death of 8-year-old Gabriel Fernandez said the most recent abuse investigation involving the child was more than two months past a state time limit for completing inquiries. In fact, it was just days past the state's deadline of two months.

"Ionescopade:" A review of "Ionescopade" at the Odyssey Theatre in the June 5 Calendar section said the play is closing June 9. It is running through Aug. 11.

For the record

Conviction overturned: In the June 1 LATExtra section, a California Briefing item about a court ruling said that an appellate court judge, Stephen A. Marcus, overturned the conviction of former Beverly Hills Unified School District official Karen Anne Christiansen in a conflict-of-interest case. Marcus is the Los Angeles County Superior Court judge who originally sentenced Christiansen to four years in prison and ordered her to pay $3.5 million in restitution. It was a panel of appellate judges that vacated those orders and said all charges against Christiansen should be dismissed.

Baseball: In the June 3 Sports section, the caption with a photo of Kansas City pitcher Ervin Santana said that the Royals defeated the Texas Rangers, 3-1. The Rangers won the game by that score.

For the record

Argentine debt: A May 28 article in Section A about a legal battle over Argentina's sovereign debt suggested that New York hedge fund Elliott Associates had won judgments against numerous debtor nations. The fund has won judgments against three countries.

AOC restaurant: In the June 1 Saturday section, a review of AOC Wine Bar and Restaurant gave an incorrect phone number. The correct number is (310) 859-9859.

For the record

"Candy Crush Saga": In the May 26 Calendar section, an article about the mobile game "Candy Crush Saga" said that the game's developer, King.com, also released the game "Bejewled Blitz." That game was published by PopCap Games. Also, King.com has recently changed its name to King, and its game "Bubble Witch Saga" is not a "match three" game, as the article stated, but a "bubble shooter."

For the record

Sex abuse lawsuit: In the May 23 LATExtra section, an article about a jury's award of $1.4 million to a girl who was sexually abused by a classmate said that jurors had apportioned part of the money to the Los Angeles Unified School District and part to the perpetrator. The attorneys agreed in advance to the apportionment, not the jury.

School nurses: In the May 30 LATExtra section, an article about the role of school nurses in administering insulin shots said that lawyer Dennis Maio represented the American Diabetes Assn. and the Disabilities Rights Education and Defense Fund at a California Supreme court hearing. While Maio argued on behalf of both groups before the court, only the diabetes association was his client. The defense fund was co-counsel in the case.

Medical device tax: In the May 22 Business section, a column about an excise tax on medical devices said that the industry employs 13,000 workers in California, accounting for seven-tenths of 1% of state employment. In fact, the industry in 2011 employed 72,000 workers in California, according to an industry survey. Those workers represent four-tenths of 1% of civilian employment in California.

"House of Cards": In the May 30 Envelope section, an article about the show "House of Cards" quoted actor Kevin Spacey as saying he pitched the idea for the series to director David Fincher. In fact, Spacey was relating how Fincher pitched the idea to him.

Malibu beach access: In the May 29 Section A, the caption for a photo that accompanied a column about a new smartphone app for Malibu beach access identified the people pictured on ATVs as security guards. In fact, the photo showed a security guard on the far left and two Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies.

For the record

Monsanto protest: In the May 26 California section, an article about an anti-Monsanto protest in Los Angeles said that Proposition 37, which would have required labeling of some genetically modified foods, was defeated in November with 53% of voters casting ballots against it. The final count showed 51.4% voting against the measure. Also, the article said that more than 4 million voters had supported the measure. More than 6 million voters supported it, according to the California secretary of state.

Dodgers: In the May 28 Sports section, a Dodgers FYI item about the team's sending shortstop Dee Gordon to Albuquerque said that Gordon was out of options and therefore could be demoted to the minor leagues without clearing waivers. Each major league player can be moved back and forth from the big-league team to the minors a certain number of times. These are called options. Gordon actually has options remaining, which is why the Dodgers could send him to the minors without his clearing waivers. Otherwise, he could have been claimed by another major league team and moved to that organization.

Actors in World War II: In the May 27 Calendar section, an information box accompanying the Classic Hollywood column about actors who served during World War II said that Glenn Ford was in the Navy. Ford served as a Marine during the war; he joined the U.S. Naval Reserve in 1958.

Headphones: In the May 26 Image section, an article about new headphones designed by Andrea Lieberman and the electronics brand Frends said that the headphones were scheduled to go on sale beginning May 29. After the article was published, the sale date was changed to May 30.

For the record

UCLA basketball: In the May 19 Sports section, a profile of new Bruins Coach Steve Alford said that in 2005 former Iowa basketball player Pierre Pierce pleaded guilty to first-degree burglary, assault with intent to commit sexual assault and fourth-degree criminal mischief. Pierce pleaded to third-degree burglary and false imprisonment in addition to intent to commit sexual abuse and fourth-degree criminal mischief.

Restaurant guide: A special restaurant guide in today's editions includes an incorrect address for the Apple Pan. The correct address is 10801 W. Pico Blvd. in West Los Angeles. The error was discovered after the section had been printed.

Gay parenting: In the May 21 LATExtra section, an article about gay parenting said that the Salt Lake City area had the nation's largest percentage of same-sex couples raising children. The percentage is the highest among large metropolitan areas with more than 1 million people.

Suburban poverty: In the May 20 LATExtra section, an article about the rise in the number of poor people living in suburbs in the U.S. said that the number surged 67% between 2000 and 2011. The increase was 64%.

For the record

Ray Manzarek: The obituary of the Doors' keyboardist Ray Manzarek in the May 21 LATExtra section said that Pearl Jam singer Eddie Vedder was among the guests who sang with Manzarek and guitarist Robby Krieger when the pair resumed touring over the last dozen years. Vedder sang with Manzarek, Krieger and drummer John Densmore when the Doors were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1993.

For the record

Murad Inc. move: An article in the May 16 Business section about skincare company Murad Inc. relocating its headquarters within El Segundo misidentified the real estate brokerage Newmark Grubb Knight Frank as Newmark Knight Grubb.

For the record

Catalina Island Museum exhibit: In the May 13 LATExtra section, an article about a Catalina Island Museum exhibition devoted to Ralph Glidden, who looted Native American graves for profit eight decades ago, said that hundreds of skeletons, skulls and thousands of teeth he unearthed were moved to UCLA. The remains are being housed there only temporarily until arrangements are made for repatriation elsewhere.

For the record

DNA and breast cancer: A Q&A in the May 15 Section A about how genes influence breast cancer risk implied that the average woman's risk of developing breast cancer was 50%. As stated elsewhere in the article, most women face a 12% to 13% lifetime risk of the disease. For women who have certain mutations in their BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, that risk rises to between 50% and 87%.

USC donors chart: A chart in the May 15 Calendar section with an article about Dr. Dre and Jimmy Iovine pledging $70 million to USC had the headline "Biggest USC donors." The chart listed celebrity donors, not the biggest donors to the university.

Carbon dioxide emissions: An article in the May 13 Section A about efforts to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired plants said that American coal plants are the single-biggest source of greenhouse gases in the world. They are the single-biggest source in the United States.

Atomic past: An article in the May 12 Section A about atomic testing in Nevada referred to the bombs dropped on Japan at the end of World War II as hydrogen bombs. They were atomic bombs. In addition, the article said that there were 235 detonations at the Nevada Test Site from 1951 to 1962. There were approximately 100 above-ground detonations at the site.

Court-martial: An article in the May 14 Section A on the court-martial of Army Sgt. John Russell, who was found guilty of murder in the deaths of five fellow servicemen in Iraq, said Navy Cmdr. Charles "Keith" Springle had a degree in clinical psychology. His degree was in social work. In addition, the article said Springle had not met Russell. Springle had seen Russell as a patient once before the shooting.

Arrest in Texas: An article in the May 11 LATExtra section about the arrest in West, Texas, of paramedic Bryce Reed on a pipe-bomb charge said that he was taken into custody Friday. Reed was arrested late Thursday.

For the record

Healthcare law: An article in the May 11 Section A about President Obama's efforts to get Americans to enroll in health insurance said that a healthcare campaign by the California Foundation had devoted more than $200 million to a Spanish-language media campaign with television giant Univision designed to educate Latinos about the healthcare law. The group is the California Endowment, not the California Foundation, and its $225-million campaign to support implementation of the Affordable Care Act includes, but is not limited to, the Spanish-language campaign with Univision.

Hair extensions: An article in the May 12 Image section about hair loss solutions cited a report in the Atlantic as saying that more than $1.3 billion worth of raw human hair was imported into the United States in 2011 compared with $1.8 billion worth of bananas. The report actually said: "As a commercial item, human hair is insignificant when compared with, say, bananas. In 2011, the U.S. brought in over $1.8 billion worth of fresh bananas. During the same 12 months, around $1.3 million of raw human hair entered this country. Still, it is a noteworthy import, given that it is harvested not from banana plants but from human heads."

Prison plan: An article in the May 3 LATExtra section said that Gov. Jerry Brown's office produced a plan to reduce prison crowding by releasing thousands of inmates early. In fact, the plan proposes releasing hundreds, not thousands, of inmates. In addition, a For the Record item in the May 5 Section A addressing this issue gave the publication date of the article as May 4.

"Dulce Rosa": In the May 14 Calendar section, an article about the new opera "Dulce Rosa" at the Broad Stage in Santa Monica said it would be opening Sunday. It opens Friday.

Herald Examiner photos: A column in the May 13 Section A about a reunion of Los Angeles Herald Examiner photographers said that the Los Angeles Public Library had scanned about 90,000 images from the defunct newspaper's archives and placed them on the Web. In fact, the library's online collection of 90,000 images contains about 10,000 pictures from the Herald. In addition, the article referred to a photograph of O.J. Simpson carrying the Olympic torch up a hill in Pacific Palisades in 1984. Simpson carried the torch up the California Incline in Santa Monica, which is straddled by Palisades Park.

For the record

Negative campaigning: In the May 4 Section A, a column about the mayoral campaign reported that candidate Wendy Greuel said she resorted to negative campaigning in response to an advertisement by backers of her rival, Eric Garcetti. Greuel cited a video depicting her as cartoon villain Cruella De Vil, which Greuel's campaign said was an ad Garcetti's supporters posted online during the primary campaign. In fact, the video was not an ad and did not appear online until April 25, more than a month after the primary election, when its creator posted it on his YouTube channel and personal blog. The video's creator says he has no connection to Garcetti or his campaign, and he is not a campaign contributor.

"Flashdance" review: In the May 9 Calendar section, a review of "Flashdance the Musical" identified the actress playing Alex as Emily Padgett. Padgett, who was correctly identified in the photograph that accompanied the review, previously played Alex. Jillian Mueller portrayed Alex in the production that was reviewed at the Segerstrom Center for the Arts in Costa Mesa.

For the record

Grand Park filming: In the May 1 LATExtra section, an article about Los Angeles County supervisors approving new filming fees for downtown's Grand Park said that crews would have to pay as much as $5,000 a day to use the site, depending on when and where they shoot. Actually, production firms will have to pay as much as $5,000 per block of park space they use.

Daytime Emmy Awards: In the May 2 Calendar section, a Quick Takes item about nominations for the Daytime Emmy Awards misspelled the first name of longtime game show host Monty Hall as Monte.

For the record

Safety recall: In the April 30 Business section, an article about a Nissan safety recall said that Maxxis — Nissan's spare tire supplier — had a faulty inflation gauge on an air pump and was either overinflating or underinflating spare tires. The faulty equipment belonged to Nissan and was located at the automaker's Canton, Miss., plant.

State environmental laws: In the April 18 LATExtra section, an article about the California Environmental Quality Act said that a group called California Unions for Reliable Energy has filed dozens of environmental lawsuits that can delay construction of power plants. It should have said the group has filed dozens of lawsuits and interventions in regulatory proceedings that can delay construction of power plants.

British war-era poster: In the May 1 Section A, a headline on an article about a British World War II-era poster with the slogan "Keep calm and carry on" said that there was a copyright dispute over the phrase. The dispute is over a trademark. Also, a photo caption that accompanied the story referred to a vendor's copyright. It should have said trademark.

Santa Monica-Malibu schools: In the April 28 Section A, an article about Malibu schools seeking a split from the Santa Monica-Malibu School District said that Charlotte Biren played violin in Santa Monica High School's top orchestra. She played the viola.

For the record

Mayoral contributions: In the April 30 LATExtra section, an article about a Los Angeles mayoral debate said that a union representing Department of Water and Power workers had spent $3.5 million on behalf of candidate Wendy Greuel. In fact, the union has given $1.45 million to an independent committee that has reported spending $3.6 million on efforts to elect Greuel.

Valley fever risk: In the April 30 LATExtra section, an article about a recommendation to move inmates from some California prisons because of the risk of contracting valley fever said that a state health official wrote to the department of corrections seeking assistance in combating the disease. The state official sought assistance from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Sneaks list: In the April 28 Calendar section's Summer Sneaks list of coming movies, the character name Themistokles was misspelled as Themistocles in an item for "300: Rise of an Empire" as well as in a caption under a photo of actor Sullivan Stapleton from that movie.

For the record

Herbalife meeting: In the April 26 Business section, an article about Herbalife's shareholder meeting indicated that investor Robert L. Chapman Jr. said that board members answered his questions openly after the meeting. He did not say his questions were answered openly. What he said was: "If a shareholder had a question the purpose of which was to obtain an answer … and such Q&A didn't violate [securities regulations], it was right there for the asking."

Leo Branton Jr.: In the April 26 LATExtra section, the obituary of attorney Leo Branton Jr. said that Dorothy Dandridge was the first African American actress nominated for an Academy Award. She was the first African American nominated as best actress.

Boston bombings: In the April 26 Section A, an article about the Boston bombings identified Eugene Fidell, a legal expert on U.S. military law, as a professor at the Yale School of Law. He is a lecturer at the school, which is known as Yale Law School.

HIV vaccine trial: In the April 26 LATExtra section, an article about an HIV vaccine trial that was halted ahead of schedule said that the vaccine was administered in a three-shot regimen. The regimen also involved a booster, for a total of four shots.

Motorcycle deaths: In the April 26 Business section, an article about an increase in motorcycle deaths in 2012 listed one cause as "fewer states without helmet laws." The sentence should have said "fewer states with helmet laws."

For the record

"Arthur Newman": An article about the film "Arthur Newman" in the April 24 Calendar section said that the movie was the first that Colin Firth signed onto after winning an Oscar for "The King's Speech." In fact, the first was "Gambit," a remake of a 1966 film.

For the record

Internet sales tax: In the April 23 Business section, an article about a bill to allow states to require the collection of online sales taxes indicated that Texas was one of the few states that do not impose a sales tax. Texas does have a sales tax.

Bomb squad calls: In the April 23 LATExtra section, the caption for a photo that accompanied an article about a surge in bomb squad calls since the Boston Marathon explosions said that a bomb squad member pictured was carrying a backpack that was found on the Cal State L.A. campus during a bomb scare. The backpack was found at a fast-food restaurant near the campus.

TV pilots: In the April 24 Calendar section, an article about the larger number of network TV pilots being developed for next season said that CBS' ratings were down 3% compared with last season among viewers ages 18 to 49. Based on new ratings released Tuesday, CBS is now even with last year in that ratings category.

"I'll Eat You Last": In the April 24 Calendar section, an article about "I'll Eat You Last," a Broadway show based on the career of Hollywood talent agent Sue Mengers, said that the playwright, John Logan, is represented by Creative Artists Agency's Brad Silberman. His agent is CAA's Brian Siberell.

For the record

Lionel Bringuier: An article in the April 21 Arts & Books section about Los Angeles Philharmonic resident conductor Lionel Bringuier included one reference that misidentified him as an associate conductor.

Marijuana measures: In the April 22 Section A, an article about competing medical marijuana measures on Los Angeles' May 21 ballot said that Proposition D was backed by the Los Angeles County Democratic Club. It should have said the Los Angeles County Democratic Party.

For the record

Meningitis cases: An article in the April 18 LATExtra section about Los Angeles County's offer to give free meningitis vaccinations to low-income and uninsured residents said an average of about 25 deaths from the disease occur in the county each year. It should have said that about 25 cases — not deaths — occur in the county each year.

Jenny Lind explosion: An article in Sunday's LATExtra about the commemoration of the 1853 explosion aboard the steamboat Jenny Lind said amateur historians who researched the event planned to place a copy of their white paper in San Jose State University's California Room. The California Room belongs to the San Jose City Library, which is housed in the same building as the university library.


For the record

Stephen Hawking visit: In the April 13 LATExtra section, the caption for a photo with an article about physicist Stephen Hawking's visit to the Cedars-Sinai Regenerative Medicine Institute reversed the identities of two people in the photo. The photo showed institute Director Clive Svendsen speaking while Dr. Robert Baloh and others watched.

Patricia McCormick obituary: The obituary of bullfighter Patricia McCormick in the April 14 California section said that she was trained by Alejandro de Herrera. It was Alejandro del Hierro.

Bruce Lee: A chart accompanying the Classic Hollywood column about Bruce Lee in the April 15 Calendar section described 1972's "The Way of the Dragon" as the action star's final film. It was not Lee's last film.

For the record

San Gabriel Mountains: A map that accompanied an article in the April 11 LATExtra section about efforts to improve recreational facilities in the San Gabriel Mountains region enlarged the boundaries of a proposed national recreation area that would include portions of the San Gabriel River corridor. A map with the correct boundaries of the proposed recreation area can be found at http://www.latimes.com/recreationplan.

"Assisted Living": An article in the April 10 Calendar section about Winnie Holzman and Paul Dooley's new play, "Assisted Living," said that the musical "Wicked," which Holzman wrote, had made more than $300 million. The play has made more than $300 million in profit, not gross revenue.

Dance school: A Quick Takes item in the April 12 Calendar section referred to Jodie Gates as the new dean of the USC Glorya Kaufman School of Dance. Her title is vice dean and director.

For the record

"Evil Dead": An article in the April 8 Calendar section about movie box office results for the previous weekend said that the original "Evil Dead" film was released 30 years ago. The film came out 32 years ago, in 1981.

For the record

Japanese garden: In the April 6 Saturday section, an information box with an article about the Storrier Stearns Japanese Garden in Pasadena gave incomplete information for an April 28 Garden Conservancy tour. A ticket package for all six homes on the tour will be sold for $25 on April 28 at Arlington Garden, 285 Arlington Drive, Pasadena. An individual $5 ticket for only Storrier Stearns will be sold at that garden, 270 Arlington Drive.

Roger Ebert: A remembrance of film critic Roger Ebert in the April 5 Calendar section said that Ebert's father worked for the University of Chicago. He worked for the University of Illinois.

Ontario airport: An article in the April 4 LATExtra section about negotiations to transfer LA/Ontario International Airport from an authority in Los Angeles to one in the Inland Empire said that the airport was 37 miles west of downtown Los Angeles. It is 37 miles east. A For the Record item in the April 5 Section A said that the article was published March 4.

For the record

Ontario airport: An article in the April 4 LATExtra section about negotiations to transfer LA/Ontario International Airport from an authority in Los Angeles to one in the Inland Empire said that the airport was 37 miles west of downtown Los Angeles. It is 37 miles east.

Milo O'Shea: The obituary of actor Milo O'Shea in the April 4 LATExtra section referred to Queen Mary as the mother of the current British monarch. She was the grandmother of the current British monarch.

Brain research initiative: An article in the April 3 Section A about the Obama administration's new brain research initiative said that the Human Genome Project received $3.8 billion in federal funding over five years. That funding was disbursed over 15 years.

For the record

UCLA basketball: An article in the April 3 Sports section about the hiring of Steve Alford by UCLA said that the new basketball coach would bring along his son, Kyle, to play for the Bruins. Bryce is the son who will join UCLA's team.

Mobile payment systems: An article in the April 2 Business section about California's money transfer law said that the FaceCash payment system employed facial-recognition software. In fact, FaceCash stores images that pop up on cashier's screens for visual verification. Additionally, the article said that PayPal Inc. processed $165 billion in Internet transactions last year. The amount processed by PayPal last year was $145 billion.

Ronnie Ray Smith: A brief obituary of sprinter Ronnie Ray Smith in the April 3 LATExtra section said that he once held a world record of 9.9 seconds in the 100-yard dash. The record time was for 100 meters.

James Bond films: In the April 2 Calendar section, an article about a James Bond festival at the Alex Theatre in Glendale said that Maud Adams was the only actress to appear in two James Bond films. Martine Beswick also appeared in two Bond movies, 1963's "From Russia With Love" and 1965's "Thunderball."

For the record

Justin Timberlake sales: A Quick Takes item in the March 27 Calendar section about first-week sales for Justin Timberlake's album "The 20/20 Experience" said that it was the 19th album in Nielsen SoundScan's 22-year history to sell more than 900,000 albums in a single week. It was the 19th album in that period to sell more than 900,000 albums in its debut week. The article also misspelled the title of Timberlake's 2006 album "FutureSex/LoveSounds" as "FutureSex/LoveSound."

Mayoral endorsements: An article in the April 2 LATExtra section about mayoral candidate Eric Garcetti getting the support of former contender Kevin James said that onetime candidate Emanuel Pleitez endorsed Garcetti earlier this month. Pleitez endorsed Garcetti in March.

Apple Final Cut Pro X: An article in the March 28 Business section about Apple's marketing effort for its editing software Final Cut Pro X described Jonathan Contreras as an Azteca telenovela editor. Contreras is not an Azteca employee and does not edit their telenovelas.

Jack Horner: A "Working Hollywood" article in the March 31 Calendar section about paleontologist Jack Horner said that he was on the faculty of the University of Montana. He is on the faculty at Montana State University.

Long pop songs: An article in the March 30 Section A about the growing length of pop songs said that the average length of a hit from the decade of the 2010s was four minutes and 14 seconds. It was 4:26, as an accompanying graphic showed.

For the record

Deke Richards: An obituary of Motown songwriter and producer Deke Richards in the March 27 LATExtra section misidentified Richards' father, screenwriter Dane Lussier, as Dane Richards.

"Doctor Who": An article in the March 24 Calendar section about the British series "Doctor Who" implied that BBC America showed the series when it returned in 2005; the channel didn't show the new series until 2009. From 2006 to '08, it aired in the U.S. on Sci Fi.

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