Public review begins for expansion of Mexican wolf habitat

Public review begins for expansion of Mexican wolf habitat

The Interior Department this week opened to public comment and review its proposal to expand the range of federally protected Mexican wolves.

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Who killed the Mexican gray wolf? Feds investigate

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is investigating the killing of a female Mexican gray wolf that had been denning with pups in New Mexico.

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Western drought prompts feds to truck water and food to wild horses

Western drought prompts feds to truck water and food to wild horses

Persistent drought in the West has prompted federal agencies to begin hauling water to wild horse herds in Nevada and restricting public lands grazing across the region.

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Calculate BP's gulf oil spill damage broadly, report says

Calculate BP's gulf oil spill damage broadly, report says

The federal damage assessment of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill should take into account the broader economic and social impacts of the 2010 blowout in the Gulf of Mexico, according to a report released Wednesday by the National Research Council.

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Global population growing faster than expected, U.N. says

Global population growing faster than expected, U.N. says

This just in: Humanity is growing faster than we thought.

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Feds give solar plants priority over mining on public lands

Feds give solar plants priority over mining on public lands

Utility-scale solar plants have been given priority over mining claims on federal lands, according to a decision announced Friday.

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U.S.' 1st Atmospheric Trust Litigation case to begin in New Mexico

U.S.' 1st Atmospheric Trust Litigation case to begin in New Mexico

A federal judge in New Mexico on Wednesday will hear opening arguments in a first-of-its-kind case: Whether the state has violated its public trust duty to protect the New Mexico’s atmosphere.

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May global temperature ties as third warmest on record

May global temperature ties as third warmest on record

Last month was among the hottest Mays in the 134-year global record, tying with 1998 and 2005 as the third warmest.

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UC Davis professor Daniel Sperling wins Blue Planet Prize

UC Davis professor Daniel Sperling wins Blue Planet Prize

Daniel Sperling, a UC Davis civil engineering professor and international transportation expert, has won the Blue Planet Prize.

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Warming temperatures taking the sparkle out of some wines

Warming temperatures taking the sparkle out of some wines

Business is not so bubbly for sparkling wine makers. Climate change is bringing higher temperatures to regions like Champagne, France, where delicate vines are succumbing to heat.

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Latest attempt to reintroduce Mexican wolves to the wild fails

Latest attempt to reintroduce Mexican wolves to the wild fails

A pair of Mexican wolves that had been waiting for their final release into the wild in Arizona are heading back to captivity after federal officials determined that the alpha male of an existing  pack behaved aggressively toward them.

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Climate change could slash snowfall in Southern California mountains

Climate change is likely to wipe a lot of the white from those postcard winter scenes of Los Angeles ringed by snow-capped mountains, according to new research.

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Website helps track state's progress on renewable energy goals [Updated]

Ratepayers can monitor the progress of California’s utilities as they move toward meeting the state’s renewable energy goals.

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Wolves losing federal protection; small group exempted

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Friday announced it intends to drop all federal protections for gray wolves in the lower 48 states, carving out an exception for a struggling population of Mexican wolves in New Mexico and Arizona.

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Despite more people and more cars, California's smog is in retreat

Despite a three-fold increase in people and cars in the last 50 years, California’s strict vehicle emissions standards have managed to significantly clear the state’s air, according to¬† new research.

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U.S. water infrastructure needs $384-billion upgrade, EPA says

The federal government must spend at least $384 billion to improve the nation’s drinking water infrastructure in order to ensure the safe delivery of water to Americans for the next 20 years.

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EPA survey ranks California No. 1 in water infrastructure needs

California could use $44.5 billion to fix aging water systems over the next two decades, according to a federal survey that placed the state at the top of a national list of water infrastructure needs.

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Oil dispersants must be checked before use in waters, ruling says

Environmentalists won a big victory for marine animals this week, with a court ruling that requires the government to determine whether dispersants used to to break up oil spills are harmful to endangered species before the chemicals are used in federal waters off California.

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California native fish could disappear with climate change

Climate change could be the final blow for many of California’s native fish species, pushing them to extinction with extended drought, warmer water temperatures and altered stream flow.

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Europeans seemingly healthier than ever -- with some caveats

The good news from a report just released by the European Environment Agency and the Joint Research Centre at the European Commission is that Europeans are living longer and healthier lives than ever. For that they can thank rigorous government policies that protect air, water and food from harmful contaminants.

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Endangered sea turtles in harm's way in Gulf of Mexico

Federal scientists for the first time have mapped the migration patterns and feeding grounds of Kemp’s ridley sea turtle in the Gulf of Mexico, and the study reveals that the favored feeding sites for the endangered turtles overlap with the most-damaged areas of the gulf.

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Cattle grazing can promote cheatgrass dominance, study finds

Ranchers often argue that cattle grazing is the best way to combat cheatgrass, an aggressive invader that has taken over vast areas of the Great Basin, destroying the native sagebrush ecosystem and fueling huge wildfires.

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What do we spend to preserve nature? $40 billion

Some say that you can’t put a price on precious natural resources. As of this week, you can.

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Feds to study oil exploration's effects on marine life

Two federal agencies on Friday announced a major review of how seismic testing for oil and gas deposits affects marine mammals and fish in deep waters off the Gulf of Mexico.

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U.S. to protect endangered loggerhead sea turtle habitat

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has two months to identify suitable in-water nesting and migratory habitat for endangered loggerhead sea turtles, according to a legal settlement filed this week.

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Pesticides, parasites and poor forage hurting bee pollinators

Although honeybee loss slowed last year, it remains at dangerously high levels, according to a new federal report that concluded there was no single remedy for the colony collapse that has hit America’s hard-working crop pollinators.

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Hours reduced at Mojave National Preserve's Kelso Depot

The Kelso Depot Visitor Center in Mojave National Preserve, the park’s popular historic site, is about to be affected by federal spending cuts.

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The consensus seems to be: Let somebody else fix the delta

Confidential surveys of water officials, water users and others involved with the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta offer some telling insight on why the delta is stuck in a perpetual quagmire.

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Bay Area air pollution reaches Devils Postpile National Monument

That fresh, pine-scented mountain air that you happily breathe in the Sierra Nevada could be hazardous to your health.

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Freeway air pollution travels farther in early morning

Two years ago researchers outfitted an electric Toyota RAV4 with a set of test instruments and drove back and forth near four Los Angeles County freeways between 4:30 a.m. and 6:30 a.m., sampling the air.

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Western gray wolf numbers fall

The number of gray wolves in the northern Rocky Mountain region declined about 7% last year, the first significant population drop in the region since wolves were reintroduced in 1995.

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Officials call for limits on use of super-toxic rat poison

D-CON kills rats and mice, the label reads. And, according to state and federal officials, it can kill hawks, owls, eagles, foxes, bobcats, mountain lions and other non-targeted wildlife too.

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