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Kurt Busch is reinstated by NASCAR

NASCAR reinstates Kurt Busch after authorities chose not to charge him in a domestic-violence case

NASCAR lifted its indefinite suspension of driver Kurt Busch on Wednesday, a week after prosecutors in Delaware said they would not pursue domestic-violence charges against the 2004 Cup champion.

Busch will be allowed to compete in Sunday's Sprint Cup race at Phoenix International Raceway and would be allowed to take part in NASCAR's "Chase for the Cup" championship if he were to qualify. However, NASCAR has placed him under indefinite probation.

“We have made it very clear to Kurt Busch our expectations for him moving forward, which includes participation in a treatment program and full compliance with all judicial requirements as a result of his off-track behavior,” Steve O'Donnell, NASCAR executive vice president, told the Associated Press.

Busch missed the season's first three races when NASCAR suspended him after a family court judge found he "more likely than not" committed domestic violence against his former girlfriend. Busch's suspension came down days before the Daytona 500, barring him from competing in the biggest race of the season.

Patricia Driscoll claimed she was physically abused by Busch during an incident in his motor home at Delaware's Dover International Speedway on Sept. 26. Busch denied the allegations.

David W. Jones, a family court commissioner in Kent County, Del., last month granted Driscoll a no-contact order against Busch.

On Thursday, the Delaware attorney general's office declined to pursue a criminal case against Busch, saying it found “the admissible evidence and available witnesses would likely be insufficient to meet the burden of establishing beyond a reasonable doubt that Mr. Busch committed a crime.”

O'Donnell said the absence of a criminal case against Busch "removed a significant impediment" to his reinstatement.

“He has fully complied with our reinstatement program during his suspension and the healthcare expert who conducted his evaluation recommended his immediate return,” O'Donnell said.

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