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Does Washington Bravehearts trademark mean Redskins will change name?

Hail to the Bravehearts?

Aris Mardirossian, allegedly a Potomac, Md., neighbor of Washington Redskins owner Daniel Snyder, registered the trademark Washington Bravehearts for “entertainment in the nature of football games” earlier this month, TMZ first reported  Friday.

Mardirossian also launched Washington Brave Hearts LLC on Oct. 17, the same day he registered the team name with the United States Patent and Trademark office, also according to TMZ.

In addition, he purchased the domain name WashingtonBraves.com through GoDaddy on Oct. 18, according to CBSSports.com.

Snyder has been under enormous pressure lately to change the Redskins name, which is considered offensive by many Native Americans. Oneida Indian officials who oppose the nickname as a slur will meet with NFL officials next week in New York City, a tribe spokesman said Friday.

The Washington, D.C., franchise owner has stood strong in refusing to even consider a new moniker for his beloved team.

Friday's news has some thinking Snyder may be having a change of heart. Multiple sources have reported that he and Mardirossian are neighbors who joined forces years ago in a lawsuit against the National Park Services in an effort to have a tree chopped down in front of their properties (they lost).

But a Redskins spokesperson has since told everyone to stop jumping to conclusions.

“There is no connection between the Washington Redskins and the trademark application,” the spokesperson said. “Dan Snyder does not know the man named in the story.”

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