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Great Reads

Today's Great Read

  • Theater troupe takes on Jewish female stereotypes
    Theater troupe takes on Jewish female stereotypes

    Ronda Spinak squeezed more folding chairs into a Brentwood living room, which that afternoon had been transformed, with much shuffling of couches and tables, into a temporary theater.

  • Thai Muslim mosque in Azusa is a work of faith
    Thai Muslim mosque in Azusa is a work of faith

    It is near midnight. The Ramadan prayers have just been said, the congregants have paid respect to Allah and headed home. Only the gray-haired imam and his wife remain at the little house of faith they have devoted their lives to.

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More Great Reads

More Great Reads

  • A newsstand where the world still unfolds as print fades to black
    A newsstand where the world still unfolds as print fades to black

    A red truck pulls into an empty parking lot off Fairfax Avenue just before 6 a.m. René Portillo gets out in a rush and heads to a blue shoe box of a building wearing a message in faded paint: "THE NEW YORK TIMES Expect The World." To the right, a California Lottery banner...

  • California drought imperils a dream
    California drought imperils a dream

    At first they called Fred Lujan a gentleman farmer.

  • Kenyan kids jump across the world
    Kenyan kids jump across the world

    When she first picked up a jump-rope, at age 11, Beryl Atieno was just another young girl in Kibera, Nairobi's notorious slum. Her horizon didn't extend far past its mud-slick streets and jagged patchwork of rusting rooftops.

  • Playwright's 'ghosts' reflect spirit of Santa Ana
    Playwright's 'ghosts' reflect spirit of Santa Ana

    Writing 'The Long Road Today' required Jose Cruz Gonzalez to convince locals to share memories, fears and hopes about their home.

  • A decades-old same-sex marriage complicates a green-card case
    A decades-old same-sex marriage complicates a green-card case

    Anthony Sullivan and Richard Adams were spending a quiet evening watching television in their Tujunga home when Johnny Carson joked about some liberal county clerk in Colorado who had done the unthinkable: issued a marriage license to two men.

  • A tree's cinematic fame continues to grow in East L.A.
    A tree's cinematic fame continues to grow in East L.A.

    After traveling to Los Angeles from a small town in Hungary, Richard Hellenbort could have shadowed the Brentwood Country Mart, the Chateau Marmont or the Ivy hoping to catch a glimpse of stars such as Kobe, Brad or Angelina.

  • As vinyl returns, they've got it covered
    As vinyl returns, they've got it covered

    Vinyl albums are popular again. So are the cardboard jackets that hold them. Stoughton Printing in the City of Industry is working full-out to meet demand.

  • Dinosaur hunter is making prehistory
    Dinosaur hunter is making prehistory

    Scott Richardson is up at dawn, standing atop a rocky ridgeline near his base camp, a solitary figure in the slanting light. He surveys a primordial wilderness of dry creek beds and stands of juniper and pinyon pine.

  • For him, satellite reboot is about reconnecting with an old friend
    For him, satellite reboot is about reconnecting with an old friend

    His wife calls him an egotist, NASA calls him a genius, and his friends call him a sore loser and insufferable winner.

  • Creative San Francisco laments death of guerrilla art
    Creative San Francisco laments death of guerrilla art

    Brian Goggin perched on the blue sofa that hung halfway off the roof. He looked down one last time on his guerrilla art masterpiece, "Defenestration," that had become one of the city's unlikeliest icons.

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