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(Associated Press)

Reversing another Obama-era policy, the Trump administration on Wednesday voted against a United Nations resolution that condemned the half-century-old U.S. trade embargo on Cuba.

Only Israel voted with the United States against the resolution, which called for an end to the economic embargo imposed by Congress early in the Cold War.

A total of 191 countries approved the resolution at a U.N. General Assembly meeting in New York.

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The Marriner S. Eccles Federal Reserve Board Building in Washington. Federal Reserve policymakers on Wednesday held a key interest rate steady.
The Marriner S. Eccles Federal Reserve Board Building in Washington. Federal Reserve policymakers on Wednesday held a key interest rate steady. (Andrew Harnik / Associated Press)

Federal Reserve officials on Wednesday provided an upbeat account of the economy, saying that economic activity has been "rising at a solid rate despite hurricane-related disruptions."

That bullish assessment will reinforce expectations that the Fed -- while it held interest rates steady this week, as expected -- will nudge up its benchmark rate next month.

In its statement Wednesday upon concluding a two-day meeting, the central bank said that the labor market has continued to strengthen, with the jobless rate falling even further, to 4.2% in September. (October's unemployment and hiring report will be released Friday.)

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As House Republicans struggle to produce their ambitious tax overhaul, President Trump weighed in Wednesday with an off-topic suggestion: How about repealing part of Obamacare and use the money saved on healthcare for tax cuts?

The idea is not original. Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Okla.), who often has the president's ear, floated as much during a tweet storm over the weekend.

Cotton, joined by GOP Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky, argue that repealing the mandate that all Americans carry health insurance would save $300 billion over the decade.

President Trump meets with business leaders at the White House on Tuesday.
President Trump meets with business leaders at the White House on Tuesday. (Evan Vucci / Associated Press)

Republicans delayed the long-awaited introduction of their tax-cut bill Tuesday as members continued to argue over key elements, including how fast to cut corporate rates, which state tax deductions to eliminate and whether to impose new caps on popular 401(k) retirement accounts, according to people familiar with the negotiations.

After promising that the bill would be released on Wednesday, the chairman of the tax-writing House Ways and Means Committee, Rep. Kevin Brady (R-Texas), announced late in the day that the unveiling would have to wait another day.

Although Republicans remained divided on some issues, particularly how to pay for the cuts they favored, other details were coming into focus.

Republican gubernatorial candidate Ed Gillespie, right, debates Democratic rival Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam.
Republican gubernatorial candidate Ed Gillespie, right, debates Democratic rival Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam. (Steve Helber / Associated Press)

Virginia has been swamped by fearful images as Tuesday’s state elections near: heavily tattooed and handcuffed Latinos staring balefully at the television camera, a mug shot of a convicted pedophile set loose on the state.

Versions of those ads may be headed to other states in the 2018 elections, as Republicans seek to maximize the turnout of the burgeoning Trump wing of the party with themes known to appeal to them.

The strategy in Virginia by Republican gubernatorial candidate Ed Gillespie has played heavily on themes of race and crime — itself an issue that has historically conjured racial stereotypes — in the style employed by President Trump last year.

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President Trump quickly seized on Tuesday's deadly attack in New York to promote immigration restrictions and to criticize his chief Democratic rival, New York Sen. Charles E. Schumer.

Trump's immediate labeling of the attack as a terrorist act and his calls for policy actions contrasted with his responses to the violence and a killing by white supremacists in Charlottesville, Va., in August — Trump wouldn't blame the neo-Nazis solely and said then he doesn't rush to discuss incidents without the facts — and to the mass killings in Las Vegas on Oct. 1, after which he said it was too soon to discuss gun laws.

Trump's Wednesday morning tweets followed a report from ABC News that the man apprehended in the New York attack, Sayfullo Saipov, came to the United States in 2010 through the diversity lottery program, which is designed to increase legal immigration from countries with lower numbers of migrants.