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Join a chat with 'The Knick's' Andre Holland on Tuesday at 11 a.m. PST

Andre Holland's character on the period medical drama "The Knick" enjoyed an eventful first season. As one of the country's only black surgeons, Dr. Algernon Edwards battled discrimination from within the ranks of the turn-of-the-century New York hospital and, outside its corridors, was derided by fellow blacks for his education and "fancy clothes." He carried on a clandestine affair with Cornelia Robertson, the hospital's head of board of trustees, which led to all sorts of complications and the good doctor finding himself in a very bad place by season's end.

Holland will be dropping by The Times' studio on Tuesday at 11 a.m. PST to talk about all these things and whether Edwards might catch a break in "The Knick's" upcoming second season. We're guessing from Holland's point of view, the answer to that last question will be: Hopefully not.

We'll also talk a bit about Holland's work in Ava DuVernay's "Selma," in which he played civil rights leader Andrew Young. If you have something you'd...

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Emmy Contender Chat: Joelle Carter says goodbye to 'Justified'

"Justified's" Joelle Carter stopped by The Times recently to talk about the fantastic journey she and her indomitable character, Ava Crowder, went on during the show's celebrated six-year run.

The shootings, the prison stint, the passionate and often dangerous relationship between Ava and Walton Goggins' Boyd Crowder ... and yet, somehow, Ava made it out of Harlan alive, an escape that she, in a nod to the writer behind the show's source material, calls a true "Elmore Leonard female ending."

"I knew how it was going to end, although we didn't know how we were going to get there and the way we shoot on 'Justified,' you're never quite sure," Carter says. "So I was holding my breath."

Justifiably so (sorry), given the way that Boyd pretty much murdered everyone else close to him in the season's final 13 episodes. We talked about the shocking manner Ava decided to go her own way, Boyd's reaction and how pretty much every other actor on the show wanted their characters to die -- but not Carter....

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Join 'Justified's' Joelle Carter for a live chat Tuesday at 11 a.m.

FX's great crime-drama series "Justified" ended its six-year run last week in a way that both satisfied fans and upended expectations.

Joelle Carter, who played the show's complicated heroine, Ava Crowder, will be stopping by The Times on Tuesday at 11 a.m. PDT to talk about the show's finale and its last season, which found Ava discovering untapped reservoirs of strength and determination.

We won't go into details here (just in case, for some reason — and it had better be good — that you haven't watched the episode yet). But we will spill details in the chat, where we plan to ask Carter about the whole Ava-Boyd-Raylan triangle and what the interior of Wynn Duffy's mobile dog grooming van might look like.

We'll also be taking your questions, which you can leave in the comments section here or tweet to us using the hashtag #askLATimes. See you tomorrow!

Twitter: @glennwhipp

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Emmy Contenders: 'The Fall's' Jamie Dornan found his inner stalker for some perspective

Jamie Dornan, who plays stealthy serial killer on the Netflix crime drama "The Fall,"  took extra (maybe, borderline illegal) steps in getting into the mindset of the tortured persona.

The 32-year-old Irish actor dropped by the Times on Monday for a live chat, and he found himself reluctantly revealing a tactic he used to better understand Paul Spector, the husband and father who moonlights as a psychopath serial killer with a fetish for tying up his victims before killing them.

"The first series, I did do a couple of things to try to get inside [his mind]. On the tube, which is our underground system" — Dornan began with his anecdote before stopping himself.

"Can we get arrested for this? Hold on ... this is a really bad reveal: I, like, followed a woman off the train one day to see what it felt like to pursue someone like that."

Dornan said he kept his distance from his target, and once she reached her stop, lurked behind her for a couple of blocks. And the resulting feeling was one...

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Emmy Contenders Chat: 'The Fall's' Jamie Dornan on Monday

He plays the devil in the details.

Before Jamie Dornan made his debut as kinky billionaire Christian Grey in the big-screen adaptation of "Fifty Shades of Grey," the 32-year-old Irish actor was playing another guy with a fetish -- one with a more deadly effect -- in the BBC's psychological crime thriller "The Fall."

In the Belfast-set series, which is also available to stream on Netflix, Dornan plays Paul Spector, a father and husband who moonlights as a serial killer who charms and seduces women -- and has a fetish for tying them up before killing them. 

And he'll be joining us for a live video chat on Monday at 1 p.m. PT to discuss the killer role, which finds him starring opposite former-and-upcoming "X-Files" queen Gillian Anderson, who plays the police detective charged with catching him.

It may just be a hunch, but we imagine Dornanites might have a question or two. Questions can be submitted on Twitter at #askLATimes or by putting them in the comments section here. And for those...

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Emmy Contenders: Ilana Glazer, Abbi Jacobson bring 'Broad City' to our city

Abbi Jacobson and Ilana Glazer, stars of the breakout Comedy Central series "Broad City," stopped by The Times recently to talk about their phenomenally funny show, which just completed its second season.

Topics of discussion included the stellar list of guest stars -- Amy Ryan, Seth Rogen, Patricia Clarkson and Kelly Ripa among them -- that popped up during the season, the movie they're writing right now (it's not for themselves, but some other lucky recipient) and what their "Broad City" characters might do if they found themselves in Los Angeles. (Jumbo's Clown Room and In-N-Out topped the to-do list and, yes, these New Yorkers know about the secret menu.)

We also talked about some of the series' more outrageous moments, well -- as much as we could, given that we don't have a three-second delay here at our television studio.

"We have very different moments when we're shooting that are the most terrifying for us," Jacobson says. "Mine are being naked and Ilana's are not being naked."...

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