Kenneth Turan

Columnist

Kenneth Turan is film critic for the Los Angeles Times and National Public Radio’s Morning Edition as well as the director of the Los Angeles Times Book Prizes. He has been a staff writer for the Washington Post as well as the Times’ book review editor. A graduate of Swarthmore College and Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism, he teaches film reviewing and non-fiction writing at USC. His most recent books are “Never Coming To A Theater Near You” and “Free For All: Joe Papp, The Public and The Greatest Theater Story Ever Told.”

Recent Articles

  • 'Woman in Gold' an adequate film on dazzling Klimt painting
    'Woman in Gold' an adequate film on dazzling Klimt painting

    "That's quite a painting," someone says in "Woman in Gold" on first glimpsing Gustav Klimt's celebrated "Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I," and anyone seeing the artwork in person during its brief visit to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art or at its current home at New York's Neue Galerie...

  • Kenneth Turan's DVD pick: Comedies with Colbert (no, not Stephen)
    Kenneth Turan's DVD pick: Comedies with Colbert (no, not Stephen)

    There was a time within the memories of those still living that the name Colbert associated with comedy referred to the great comedian Claudette Colbert, one of the queens of black-and-white wit. To refresh memories, the folks at Criterion have issued new DVDs of two of her best and funniest...

  • 'A Wolf at the Door' a disturbing noir tale of obsession
    'A Wolf at the Door' a disturbing noir tale of obsession

    Potent sexual attraction can be a wonderful thing, but it can also bring out the absolute worst in the people involved, as the bleak, disturbing Latin American noir "A Wolf at the Door" convincingly demonstrates.

  • Life's amusing little trip-ups 'While We're Young' and ever after
    Life's amusing little trip-ups 'While We're Young' and ever after

    Sharp, funny and dead-on accurate about the way we live now, "While We're Young" is not a film about eternal youth but, rather, about coming to terms with growing older. This delicious satire about aging hipsters and their discontents is everything we've come to expect from the best of Noah...

  • Revisiting 'Exodus' is well worth the trip
    Revisiting 'Exodus' is well worth the trip

    Israel has been so much in the news lately that this couldn't be a better time to revisit the original 1960 "Exodus," the Otto Preminger-directed examination of the turmoil surrounding the founding of the state (based on the Leon Uris novel) that influenced American attitudes when it was...

  • 'Insurgent' smartly gives the Divergent Tris room to run
    'Insurgent' smartly gives the Divergent Tris room to run

    When superhero franchises falter, studios often reboot them, starting over from a different perspective with a different cast. What's happened with "The Divergent Series: Insurgent" is less drastic but similar: A successful series has kept its cast but been revamped in the middle of its run.

  • '1971' recalls burglary that birthed America's 'big brother'
    '1971' recalls burglary that birthed America's 'big brother'

    "1971" is an appropriately matter-of-fact title for a decidedly low-key documentary. But don't mistake a lack of flash for an absence of substance. The story told here couldn't be more significant or more timely.

  • In fast-paced 'Run All Night,' Liam Neeson and Ed Harris shine
    In fast-paced 'Run All Night,' Liam Neeson and Ed Harris shine

    "Run All Night" is genre to the core, a violent action thriller about a critical 16 hours in the lives of some very bad people, but that doesn't mean there aren't any number of good things in it.

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