ENTERTAINMENT
We’re at Comic-Con! Follow along for live coverage >>
ENTERTAINMENT

Kenneth Turan

Columnist

Kenneth Turan is film critic for the Los Angeles Times and National Public Radio’s Morning Edition as well as the director of the Los Angeles Times Book Prizes. He has been a staff writer for the Washington Post as well as the Times’ book review editor. A graduate of Swarthmore College and Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism, he teaches film reviewing and non-fiction writing at USC. His most recent books are “Never Coming To A Theater Near You” and “Free For All: Joe Papp, The Public and The Greatest Theater Story Ever Told.”

Recent Articles

  • 'Wilderpeople' is quickly finding a summer audience

    'Wilderpeople' is quickly finding a summer audience

    It's got an awkward title and a rambunctious spirit that is difficult to accurately describe, but “Hunt for the Wilderpeople” is fast becoming the independent film word-of-mouth hit of the summer, and deservedly so. Directed by New Zealand's Taika Waititi, this wacky story of the way-unlikely alliance...

  • When Hollywood unexpectedly expressed its outrage and social consciousness

    When Hollywood unexpectedly expressed its outrage and social consciousness

    "12 Angry Men”  "The Angry Hills." "Anger Management." "The Last Angry Man." "Angry Birds." Throughout its history, the only reliable place anger can be found in Hollywood films has been in their titles. With one unexpected exception. On one level, this absence is perfectly understandable. Film...

  • 'Under the Sun' goes inside North Korea to expose its carefully managed public face

    'Under the Sun' goes inside North Korea to expose its carefully managed public face

    As previous documentaries ranging from the serious ("Kimjongilia") to the frivolous ("Dennis Rodman's Big Bang In Pyongyang") demonstrate, North Korea is one strange place, a truly foreign country where they do things differently. The nation is so strange and different, in fact, that each new glimpse...

  • Woody Allen finds himself at ease in his lush Hollywood story 'Cafe Society'

    Woody Allen finds himself at ease in his lush Hollywood story 'Cafe Society'

    With white on black titles on the screen and vintage jazz on the soundtrack, “Cafe Society” opens the way Woody Allen films have opened for time out of mind. But this one, this one does things a little differently. Starring Jesse Eisenberg, Kristen Stewart and the protean Steve Carell, “Cafe Society” is...

  • A gritty 'Boyz N the Hood' ushers in a new phase of cinema

    A gritty 'Boyz N the Hood' ushers in a new phase of cinema

    When "Boyz N the Hood" debuted on July 12, 1991, writer-director John Singleton helped usher in a new phase of cinema depicting African American life. Twenty-five years later, the film is still regarded as one of the most seminal in history. Here's our original review of “Boyz N the Hood,” published...

  • A family grows and deepens in the warm, rewarding 'Our Little Sister'

    A family grows and deepens in the warm, rewarding 'Our Little Sister'

    “Our Little Sister" has to be seen to be believed. Not because it depends on huge explosions or special effects but because it doesn't. A delicate, unforced meditation on the bonds of family and the joys and wonders hidden in everyday life, this film is able to move audiences without apparent effort,...

73°