Geoffrey Mohan

Writer

Geoff joined the Los Angeles Times in 2001 from Newsday, where he was a Latin American correspondent in Mexico City. He was hired as a statewide roamer, but was quickly drafted into coverage of Afghanistan and Iraq wars. Soon after returning, he was sent out to the front lines of the California wildfires, and was part of the Pulitzer Prize-winning breaking news team in 2003. Looking for a break from the action, he took refuge behind the editing desks in foreign and metro, serving as the environment editor and later, the state editor. He returned to reporting two years ago in Science, where he’s been writing about Ebola, African-clawed frogs and mathematicians who can predict NCAA winners. Now he’s coming full circle, back to roaming the state in search of stories about farmers, drought and innovation in agriculture and food science.

Recent Articles

  • EPA's bee decisions are sweet for growers, but they sting environmentalists

    EPA's bee decisions are sweet for growers, but they sting environmentalists

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency backed away from tough restrictions on how pesticides can be used while honeybees are pollinating crops, and it declared that three of the pesticides most closely associated with bee deaths are safe in most applications. The assessments, released late Thursday,...

  • California farm labor board chairman quits in anger

    California farm labor board chairman quits in anger

    William B. Gould IV, California Gov. Jerry Brown’s appointee to lead the board charged with protecting the rights of the state’s farmworkers, announced his resignation Friday, accusing the state bureaucracy of stalling one of his key proposals. Gould, appointed by Brown to chair the Agricultural...

  • Chicken industry pushes against movement that wants svelter, slower-growing birds

    Chicken industry pushes against movement that wants svelter, slower-growing birds

    The chicken industry pushed back Wednesday against a growing campaign to move away from breeding larger birds that bulk up quickly, saying the “slow-growth” movement would use more energy, cost shoppers more and possibly result in less protein on people’s plates. If even a third of the nation’s...

  • Is Burger King's antibiotic policy less than meets the eye?

    Is Burger King's antibiotic policy less than meets the eye?

    Burger King’s parent company is the latest fast-food giant to take a stand on the use of antibiotics to raise chickens, but food safety critics are not exactly crowing. Restaurant Brands International pledged Thursday to avoid buying poultry fed antibiotics considered “critically important” to...

  • For a budding botanist, the pomegranate is a family tree

    For a budding botanist, the pomegranate is a family tree

    The first pomegranate that John Chater grasped bled crimson drops onto his tan suede shoes.  The leathery hull brimmed with dark, translucent seeds bigger than his baby teeth, and when he nibbled them they burst with a sweetness his toddler tongue had never experienced. After that, no other fruit...

  • Why cheaper food in 2016 was not necessarily good news

    Why cheaper food in 2016 was not necessarily good news

    For food shoppers, 2016 was a back-to-the-future experience, with retail prices deflating for the first time since Lyndon Johnson was president. The year is expected to end with an annual drop of between 0.5% and 1.5% in the retail price of food prepared at home, according to the U.S. Department...

  • Back wage measure for farm workers challenged

    Back wage measure for farm workers challenged

    A law that would have settled disputes between growers and farmworkers over lost wages could come unraveled, after two fruit growers persuaded a federal court to review whether it is constitutional. Gerawan Farming Inc. and Fowler Packing Co. contend that state legislators deliberately crafted provisions...

  • On Trump's short list to run the SEC: an ex-U.S. attorney who's an L.A. native

    On Trump's short list to run the SEC: an ex-U.S. attorney who's an L.A. native

    For half a decade, U.S. Atty. Debra Wong Yang was the last person corporations would want to hear from if they were operating at the edge of the law. Now, she’s the first person they might call to defend that kind of accusation, as top crisis manager for one of the premiere corporate litigation...

55°