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Framed, Chapter 3: Secret lovers, legal maneuvering and a fictional blueprint for 'the perfect crime'
Los Angeles Times

Geoffrey Mohan

Writer

Geoff joined the Los Angeles Times in 2001 from Newsday, where he was a Latin American correspondent in Mexico City. He was hired as a statewide roamer, but was quickly drafted into coverage of Afghanistan and Iraq wars. Soon after returning, he was sent out to the front lines of the California wildfires, and was part of the Pulitzer Prize-winning breaking news team in 2003. Looking for a break from the action, he took refuge behind the editing desks in foreign and metro, serving as the environment editor and later, the state editor. He returned to reporting two years ago in Science, where he’s been writing about Ebola, African-clawed frogs and mathematicians who can predict NCAA winners. Now he’s coming full circle, back to roaming the state in search of stories about farmers, drought and innovation in agriculture and food science.

Recent Articles

  • Honeybee losses are buzz kill for crops

    Honeybee losses are buzz kill for crops

    Managed honeybee colonies suffered annual losses of 42%, with summer declines outstripping winter losses for the first time, the U.S. Department of Agriculture reported Wednesday.The declines are less steep than those associated with the mysterious widespread collapse of bee colonies, first recognized...

  • State launches push to accelerate drought innovation

    State launches push to accelerate drought innovation

    The Brown administration's effort to speed innovation to address the state's endemic droughts was launched to little fanfare Tuesday. No specific funding or timeline was included in the program posted to the California Energy Commission's website. A spokesman for the commission said it would begin...

  • Brontosaurus is back!

    Brontosaurus is back!

    The mighty Brontosaurus just stomped back into the halls of paleontology, throwing his 33-ton weight around to topple the longstanding organizational scheme for a family of ancient dinosaurs. A five-year effort to sort through hundreds of specimens in major museums worldwide suggests science should...

  • Brain knows how to stop thinking, start learning

    Brain knows how to stop thinking, start learning

    Anyone who's ever learned music probably remembers reaching a point when they just played without "thinking" about the notes.  It turns out that a little bit of disconnect goes a long way in learning motor tasks, according to a study published online Monday in the journal Nature Neuroscience.  ...

  • No surprise: A key to infant learning is surprise

    No surprise: A key to infant learning is surprise

    Baby play just got a little less random. It turns out that infants are natural scientists, spurred by surprises to test primitive hypotheses, according to a study published online Thursday in the journal Science. Eleven-month-old infants who observed something that defied their rudimentary expectations,...

  • Oceans might take 1,000 years to recover from climate change, study suggests

    Oceans might take 1,000 years to recover from climate change, study suggests

    Naturally occurring climate change lowered oxygen levels in the deep ocean, decimating a broad spectrum of seafloor life that took some 1,000 years to recover, according to a study that offers a potential window into the effects of modern warming. Earth's recovery from the last glacial period,...

  • Can money buy your kids a bigger brain?

    Can money buy your kids a bigger brain?

    Research has shown that a person's position in the economic pecking order can have a lasting effect on cognitive development. But can it also affect the size and shape of the brain? A new study suggests that a family's socioeconomic status correlates with the surface area of children's brains,...

  • Antarctic ice shelves melting 70% faster, study shows

    Antarctic ice shelves melting 70% faster, study shows

    The frozen fringes of western Antarctica have been melting 70% faster in the last decade, raising concern that an important buttress keeping land-based ice sheets from flowing to the sea could collapse or vanish in coming decades, a new study shows. An acceleration in the flow of massive ice sheets...

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