Los Angeles Times

Geoffrey Mohan

Writer

Geoff joined the Los Angeles Times in 2001 from Newsday, where he was a Latin American correspondent in Mexico City. He was hired as a statewide roamer, but was quickly drafted into coverage of Afghanistan and Iraq wars. Soon after returning, he was sent out to the front lines of the California wildfires, and was part of the Pulitzer Prize-winning breaking news team in 2003. Looking for a break from the action, he took refuge behind the editing desks in foreign and metro, serving as the environment editor and later, the state editor. He returned to reporting two years ago in Science, where he’s been writing about Ebola, African-clawed frogs and mathematicians who can predict NCAA winners. Now he’s coming full circle, back to roaming the state in search of stories about farmers, drought and innovation in agriculture and food science.

Recent Articles

  • No surprise: A key to infant learning is surprise

    No surprise: A key to infant learning is surprise

    Baby play just got a little less random. It turns out that infants are natural scientists, spurred by surprises to test primitive hypotheses, according to a study published online Thursday in the journal Science. Eleven-month-old infants who observed something that defied their rudimentary expectations,...

  • Oceans might take 1,000 years to recover from climate change, study suggests

    Oceans might take 1,000 years to recover from climate change, study suggests

    Naturally occurring climate change lowered oxygen levels in the deep ocean, decimating a broad spectrum of seafloor life that took some 1,000 years to recover, according to a study that offers a potential window into the effects of modern warming. Earth's recovery from the last glacial period,...

  • Can money buy your kids a bigger brain?

    Can money buy your kids a bigger brain?

    Research has shown that a person's position in the economic pecking order can have a lasting effect on cognitive development. But can it also affect the size and shape of the brain? A new study suggests that a family's socioeconomic status correlates with the surface area of children's brains,...

  • Antarctic ice shelves melting 70% faster, study shows

    Antarctic ice shelves melting 70% faster, study shows

    The frozen fringes of western Antarctica have been melting 70% faster in the last decade, raising concern that an important buttress keeping land-based ice sheets from flowing to the sea could collapse or vanish in coming decades, a new study shows. An acceleration in the flow of massive ice sheets...

  • Air pollution takes a double toll on babies' brains

    Air pollution takes a double toll on babies' brains

    A common pollutant in vehicle exhaust, power plant emissions and cigarette smoke can shrink white matter in fetal brains and cause developmental damage during the toddler years, a new study suggests. In 40 children examined by researchers, prenatal exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons was...

  • DNA records effects of conquest, slave trade in the Americas

    DNA records effects of conquest, slave trade in the Americas

    The Internet and modern genetics have been a pair of high-wattage searchlights slicing through one of the darkest periods of modern human history: more than three centuries of conquest, slave trade and population displacement in the Americas. Historians now can sort through ship manifests once...

  • Fossilized whale bone in African desert holds clues to human evolution

    Fossilized whale bone in African desert holds clues to human evolution

    A 22-foot beaked whale that apparently took a wrong turn up an African river about 17 million years ago may offer clues to the climate-change forces that shaped human evolution. Lost for more than 30 years, the fossilized beak with part of the jaw bone helps determine that the East African Plateau...

  • 'Anthropocene' epoch for Earth etches human impacts in stone

    'Anthropocene' epoch for Earth etches human impacts in stone

    Man's tenure on Earth is brief on the astronomical time scale, but the changes wrought by Homo sapiens have been measurable and profound. Now, a growing number of scientists propose renaming the present geologic epoch to reflect that human influence: the Anthropocene. The revision of geology's...

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