Geoffrey Mohan

Writer

Geoffrey Mohan joined the Los Angeles Times in 2001 from Newsday, where he was the Latin America Bureau Chief in Mexico City. He started off here as a statewide roamer, detoured to cover the Afghanistan and Iraq wars and was part of the team that won the Pulitzer Prize for coverage of the California wildfires in 2003. He served as an editor on the metro and foreign desks before returning to reporting on science in 2013. Now he’s coming full circle, roaming the state in search of stories about farming and food.

Recent Articles

  • Strawberry grower fined $2.4 million, demanded kickbacks from Mexican workers

    Strawberry grower fined $2.4 million, demanded kickbacks from Mexican workers

    A Northern California strawberry grower has been fined $2.4 million  and ordered to repay kickbacks and rent he demanded from Mexican workers he hired under a federal visa program for agricultural employees,  according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Gonzalo Fernandez, who operated Fernandez Farms...

  • Feds sue garlic grower after a contractor's van crash kills 4 migrant workers

    Feds sue garlic grower after a contractor's van crash kills 4 migrant workers

    The U.S. Labor Department is accusing a garlic grower of violating worker safety and transportation laws in connection with a 2015 van crash that killed four farm laborers on a California Central Valley highway. The unusual move in U.S. District Court in Fresno is aimed at sending a sterner message...

  • California wine country says goodbye to crop-threatening moth

    California wine country says goodbye to crop-threatening moth

    A moth that sparked quarantines and expensive pest-control measures in California’s wine country has been eradicated from the state, agricultural officials said Thursday. Little-known outside the viticultural world, the European grapevine moth had threatened crops valued at $5.7 billion, including wine...

  • Bee-harming pesticides are declining at plant nurseries, report shows

    Bee-harming pesticides are declining at plant nurseries, report shows

    Retailers appear to be selling fewer ornamental plants laced with pesticides linked to bee population declines, according to a new report. Less than a quarter of the trees and flowers from stores and nurseries tested by environmental activists contained pesticides at levels that could be harmful...

  • Prince's death casts spotlight on anti-opioid addiction drug

    Prince's death casts spotlight on anti-opioid addiction drug

    It was an intervention that never happened, and it featured two stars: Prince, an adored music icon, and buprenorphine, an obscure drug hailed as a revolutionary tool to fight opioid addiction.  Prince died before the first scene, when a drug-addiction consultant, a physician and Prince's associates converged...

  • Will microbes save agriculture?

    Will microbes save agriculture?

    Right under our feet. That’s where David Perry believes the next agricultural revolution will come from – the millions of unseen microbes in soil that play a crucial but complicated role in the well-being of plants. Perry believes that he can repackage beneficial bacteria and fungi as something...

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