Membership
Get unlimited digital access. Try it today for only $0.99.
Los Angeles Times

Melissa Healy

Writer

Melissa Healy is a health and science reporter with the Los Angeles Times writing from the Washington, D.C., area. She covers prescription drugs, obesity, nutrition and exercise, and neuroscience, mental health and human behavior. She's been at The Times for more than 30 years, and has covered national security, environment, domestic social policy, Congress and the White House. As a baby boomer, she keenly follows trends in midlife weight gain, memory loss and the health benefits of red wine.

Recent Articles

  • Zika virus found in fetal brain

    Zika virus found in fetal brain

    The Zika virus, thought to be responsible for a surge in birth defects in Brazil, has been found inside the abnormally small brain of an aborted fetus at roughly 29 weeks of gestation, a team of researchers reported Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine. An autopsy of the aborted fetus...

  • Adolescents should be screened for depression too, federal panel says

    Amid evidence that fewer than half of depressed adolescents get treatment for their emotional distress, a federal task force has recommended that physicians routinely screen children between 12 and 18 for depression and have systems in place either to diagnose, treat and monitor those who screen...

  • Geneticists uncover a key clue to schizophrenia

    Geneticists uncover a key clue to schizophrenia

    Scientists say they have broken new ground in the study of schizophrenia, uncovering a potentially powerful genetic contributor to the mental disorder and helping to explain why its symptoms of confused and delusional thinking most often reach a crisis state as a person nears the cusp of adulthood....

  • Federal panel recommends general physicians screen all adults for depression

    Federal panel recommends general physicians screen all adults for depression

    In a sign that the treatment of depression is shifting to the mainstream of American medical care, a federal panel has recommended that general physicians screen all adults for depression and treat those affected by the mood disorder with antidepressant medication, refer them to psychotherapy or...

  • Overweight children are a growing problem in Africa and Asia

    Overweight children are a growing problem in Africa and Asia

    Driven by the growing availability of fatty, sugary foods and beverages in low- and middle-income countries, 41 million children age 5 and under are overweight or obese, a number expected to grow to more than 70 million children worldwide during the next decade, a new World Health Organization...

  • What killed Cromwell? Or Mozart? Sleuthing doctors take on the 'ultimate whodunit'

    What killed Cromwell? Or Mozart? Sleuthing doctors take on the 'ultimate whodunit'

    The patient was dead, but the cause remained a mystery. And if there's anything doctors hate more than their inability to forestall death, it's their inability to explain it. And so, 357 years after Oliver Cromwell died at age 58, several dozen physicians convened here under the austere arches...

  • Bizarre birth defect is on the rise, and researchers are baffled

    Bizarre birth defect is on the rise, and researchers are baffled

    Physicians are seeing more instances of a birth defect in which infants are born with their intestines extruding from the stomach wall, with a particularly sharp rise among babies born to young African American mothers, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Over the 18 years...

  • Access to safer guns is favored by most in U.S., poll finds

    Access to safer guns is favored by most in U.S., poll finds

    Nearly 6 in 10 Americans — including 42.8% of gun owners — say that if they were to buy a new firearm, they would choose one equipped with technology that prevents it from being fired by an unauthorized user, a new national survey has found. The survey suggests an openness to so-called smart guns,...

Loading
81°