NATION POLITICS TRAIL GUIDE

Donald Trump heads to Toledo, Ohio. Hillary Clinton rallies in Orlando, Fla.

  • Trump faces his first questions over controversies involving his foundation and "birther" comments.
  • Despite concerns that stop-and-frisk policies are racially discriminatory, Trump wants to see the tactic expanded.
  • Clinton had nearly $20 million more cash on hand than Trump at the end of August.
  • Trump says black communities are in the worse shape "ever, ever, ever."
  • Trump's campaign tries to use gender to undercut Clinton's candidacy.
  • The two candidates' responses to the weekend's bombings show voters a stark difference in approaches to national security.

Bill Clinton says the case to approve TPP trade pact is 'clear'

 (Abdeljalil Bounhar / Associated Press)
(Abdeljalil Bounhar / Associated Press)

Bill Clinton suggested a proposed major trade deal between the U.S. and 11 Pacific Rim nations was in the nation’s foreign policy interests, but he stopped short of endorsing the plan.

The Trans Pacific Partnership is a major priority for the Obama administration, but is opposed by Clinton's candidate spouse.

“The geopolitical reasons for it from America’s point of view are pretty clear,” the former president said of the TPP in an interview with CNBC.  “It’s designed to make sure that the future of the Asia-Pacific region economically is not totally dominated by China.”

But he said Hillary Clinton has been “pretty clear” about her desire to see some additional provisions to ensure tough enforcement of currency manipulation and provide additional economic safeguards for Americans who may suffer from lowering barriers for foreign goods to enter the U.S.

According to edited video posted online by the network, Clinton said the TPP doesn’t “have anything to do with NAFTA,” the North American trade deal which was negotiated before he took office, but which he championed after taking office. Because Mexico and Canada are also party to TPP, the Obama administration has argued it is effectively a renegotiation of NAFTA and addresses many criticisms of it.

Obama has vowed to make an aggressive case for lawmakers to approve the trade deal before he leaves office, potentially in a post-election lame-duck session. Clinton has reiterated her opposition to the deal repeatedly.

“I oppose it now, I’ll oppose it after the election, and I’ll oppose it as president,” she said in Ohio in August.

In another part of the CNBC interview, Bill Clinton said he thought his wife would win the presidency, but added that he has predicted all along that the race would be tougher than many thought, citing similar anti-establishment sentiment around the world. His advice?

"Just go out there and talk to people, and, you know, not be affected by all the meanness and all this stuff that we’ve seen," he said. "I still think that she’ll be all right. But nothing much has surprised me that’s happened."

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