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Teacher Stands Firm, Delivers

--At first, substitute teacher Amy Moses thought it seemed like a movie when the armed woman entered her classroom. But the situation became all too real as Laurie Dann, 30, opened fire Friday in the Winnetka, Ill., school. By the second shot, Moses said: “Reality had hit all of us.” The children began screaming and scurrying for cover. In the first detailed eyewitness account of the shootings at Hubbard Woods Elementary School, Moses, 29, said she had just settled her class of 24 second-graders when she spotted Dann. “She came in and closed the door. I looked at her; she looked at me. She said, ‘Put all the children in the corner,’ ” Moses said, but she refused. Winnetka Police Chief Herbert Timm said that if Moses had followed Dann’s orders, all the children might have been shot. Moses said Dann produced a handgun. Moses grappled with Dann, who pulled another weapon before breaking free, firing at the children and fleeing, Moses said. Nick Corwin, 8, was killed and five other children were wounded by Dann--one of them moments before the shooting in the classroom. Dann later shot a man in his home and then shot herself to death. More than 1,000 mourners crowded a synagogue in Northfield for Nick Corwin’s funeral Monday.

--The elderly daughter of Ethiopia’s last emperor is welcome to make her home in Britain now that she is free after 14 years in an Ethiopian prison, diplomats said. Ethiopia’s pro-Soviet authorities released Princess Tenagne Work Haile Selassie, 74, from prison Saturday night, together with several other relatives of Emperor Haile Selassie, who died in 1975. Britain’s offer of sanctuary was also extended to a daughter-in-law and five granddaughters of the emperor, who was overthrown in 1974. The whereabouts of the princess were not immediately clear.

--"An Outdoor Journal: Adventures and Reflections,” Jimmy Carter’s new book scheduled for release this week by Bantam Books, portrays the former President as an avid hunter and fisherman, but the most famous outdoor adventure of his presidency--the 1979 fishing trip in which he beat back a rabbit he said was swimming toward his canoe near Plains, Ga.,--is not mentioned. “I guess I should have (included it) just to explain there was nothing to it,” Carter said, “but I don’t want to get into another altercation with the press about it. That was a contrivance of the press.” The “killer rabbit” or “banzai bunny” episode prompted cartoons and jokes at Carter’s expense. He said it would have been “an unpleasant situation” if the animal had gotten into the canoe.


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